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Awesome ! That certainly took some time to do.
 

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Cool video. What was he doing at the 2:20 mark with the blue dye?

It didn't take him that long, it was only 11 mins.
Puts dye on the blade edge that scribes it to find the exact center so he knows how much to grind down on each side. Otherwise you can end up with a lop sided knife. - At least that's what I learned from the LIF forum member EKIM's videos!
 

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no wonder why nice knives are so expensive. cool video thanks for sharing
Only legendary knife makers can get a worthwhile $/hr value....Guys that can sell a knife for $5-$700+ . Most knife makers are working for less than $15 per hour to sell a knife for $150 -$200. It simply takes a long long time to grind, Polish and make a comfortable handle. Add another hour to make a sheath if necessary.
It's the reason I don't consider making knives to sell....they are not worth what my time is worth to me.
 

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Puts dye on the blade edge that scribes it to find the exact center so he knows how much to grind down on each side. Otherwise you can end up with a lop sided knife. - At least that's what I learned from the LIF forum member EKIM's videos!
Exactly. Each side should taper to the same point in the center (unless he was doing a Japanese style knife).

I have to give credit to him for showing a fair deal of skill in knifemaking (and even more in videography), but there are a few things I'm not crazy about:
1) That cylindrical handle is pretty, but I'm sure I'd hate to hold it
2) It's still a knife made from sheet steel. A forged knife has a distal taper in it's shape (which could be achieved from sheet steel too, but isn't in this case). The grind in this case leaves a spine that is of equal thickness all the way up to the first few inches where the taper meets the curve. That makes for a knife that is unnecessarily clunky (one reason I am not a fan of Cutco blades longer than their paring knife) at this length.
3) O1 steel makes for a GREAT carving knife, but it rusts so fast in kitchen use. I just couldn't deal with that.
4) He cuts his burrito in half! Doesn't he know how to eat a burrito?

On that note, I had a relative ask recently about how to throw out old kitchen knives.
I said don't toss them, recycle them with me.

My plan is to re-use the steel into chip carving knives and the like.
 

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This guy does some real cool leather work as well . For me, knife making is a hobby that is also a side business, the proceeds from making the knives pay for the hobby which is nice. For me, I do them in my spare time or while, my real company is making money so I don't really care about hourly rate or how much my time is worth. I look at it this way, If it can be used to pay for itself or be a supplemental income its all good
 

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Exactly. Each side should taper to the same point in the center (unless he was doing a Japanese style knife).

I have to give credit to him for showing a fair deal of skill in knifemaking (and even more in videography), but there are a few things I'm not crazy about:
1) That cylindrical handle is pretty, but I'm sure I'd hate to hold it
2) It's still a knife made from sheet steel. A forged knife has a distal taper in it's shape (which could be achieved from sheet steel too, but isn't in this case). The grind in this case leaves a spine that is of equal thickness all the way up to the first few inches where the taper meets the curve. That makes for a knife that is unnecessarily clunky (one reason I am not a fan of Cutco blades longer than their paring knife) at this length.
3) O1 steel makes for a GREAT carving knife, but it rusts so fast in kitchen use. I just couldn't deal with that.
4) He cuts his burrito in half! Doesn't he know how to eat a burrito?

On that note, I had a relative ask recently about how to throw out old kitchen knives.
I said don't toss them, recycle them with me.

My plan is to re-use the steel into chip carving knives and the like.
The guy is a pro, he does really high end work, he probably just used whatever steel he had at the time for the video to show the process rather than the end product
 

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The guy is a pro, he does really high end work, he probably just used whatever steel he had at the time for the video to show the process rather than the end product
I'm not saying he is lacking in knife making skills. It is clearly evident that he made exactly what he wanted, and made it very well. I would not have made it that way, but that's not a mark against his execution.
I was just saying he is lacking in burrito eating skills.
 
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