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And let me ask....who would let your daughters fly in America today? Un - freaking - believable. We ought to have the Presidential candidates pledge to disband this criminal organization.



http://abc7ny.com/news/police-tsa-agent-molested-college-student-traveling-through-laguardia/960533/
 

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All in a days plot by the TSA...if they rigged this for men, they'll rig it for women too, outraged yet??

http://www.voicesofliberty.com/article/tsa-officers-rigged-scanners-to-prompt-sexual-molestation-sessions/

April 14, 2015-Respectable voices scoffed at the "Scope and Grope" characterization of the Transportation Security Administration's enhanced screening policy, but that's exactly the rigged system TSA officers set up in Denver.

At the screening area tsaof the Denver International Airport, a male TSA officer felt the urge to cup the private areas of attractive men. And he acted on it, recruiting a female accomplice to flip a switch on the body scanner to force an alert. When the body scanner is set for female travelers, it will signal an anomaly in the crotch if it's a male in the machine. The male TSA officer hunted for attractive men, then had the female TSA officer set the machine for a female.

The TSA was made aware of this on November 18, 2014 through a tip from another TSA employee. No action was taken for three months. Now the two offending TSA officers are fired, but because their names haven't been released and no victims have come forward, further investigation is difficult. It's unclear how long this predation went on, though CBS4 in Denver says the inappropriate pat downs occurred "roughly a dozen times."

It was TSA supervisor Chris Higgins who, on February 9, 2015, observed the male TSA officer summon his unsuspecting prey, using his palms to feel the man's genitals and buttocks. The TSA has video of the incident, but is refusing to release it.

In a statement to CBS4, the TSA said, "These alleged acts are egregious and intolerable. TSA has removed the two officers from the agency. All allegations of misconduct are thoroughly investigated by the agency. And when substantiated, employees are held accountable."

If they're alleged, why not assist in an independent investigation by the district attorney? Why fire two TSA officers if the acts are just alleged?

The TSA has never caught a terrorist. The 4th Amendment has never been repealed.
 

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I think everyone at the TSA gets their freak on - for free.
 

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Back when they started hiring TSA agents in droves after 911, I knew some(women) through my job interactions who became TSA agents. These people that were being hired, I would never trust with the safety of anyone else. Nor with keeping highly sensitive information to themselves. These women were blabber mouths and some of the biggest flirts around. One of them even became a supervisor. So it's no surprise to me to hear of such things going on.
 

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Private security employed by the airlines and accountable to the airlines...who should be accountable to the traveling public.
TSA is a terrible excuse for an organization, even a government organization. Lip service about public safety and then effectively giving the work to (in many cases) otherwise unemployable miscreants is insane.
Maybe TSA staff should be screened like NY PL holders...even use the same list of disqualifies.
Some people still push to arm these clowns.
 

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OK. I had the "pleasure" of interviewing at least a hundred of these guys and gals for a secret level security clearance before I retired, at both JFK and La Guardia. the majority of the supervisors in the first year or two came from supervisory and managerial jobs in airline or military security. Blue shirted ones doing the actual gate checking also went through a background check, which included besides the hour-long subject interview, a bull credit bureau (all 3) check, as well as an FBI check for arrests. The FBI expunges nothing so even though someone's lawyer (ambulance chaser) or ignorant judge stated that they no longer had to list the arrest in applying for a job, whether they listed it or not was really irrelevant as the investigator (although less than a third of us were federal employees) still was afforded a transcript of the arrest record, regardless of whether the person was convicted or not. My guess is that the Denver ho** was never arrested for molestation in the past, had good credit and had no substance abuse, hostile nation foreign connections, etc. etc. However, we as investigators had no input to the adjudication process, never had, and it was up to the sponsoring agency, in this case Homeland Security, to make a decision as to someone's acceptability in a position of trust with Uncle.
In addition, not that it matters, but it was private security who let the 911 hijackers board.
 

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In addition, not that it matters, but it was private security who let the 911 hijackers board.

I understand that. I also understand that in a post 9/11 world the airlines are incentivized differently than TSA to do an effective job of screening. Everyone dropped the ball on 9/11, another such attack and airlines are going to disappear. If it's not in the interest of preserving life and national security the fear of economic survival would (I think) cause them to elevate their game.
This is only my opinion but I cannot imagine anyone doing a worse job than TSA.

Those screeners have Secret clearances? Wow.
 

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But so did the mental case who killed people at the Washington Navy Yard. Secret clearances (and their equivalent levels in Homeland Security, DOE, etc.), are really nothing, waaaay too easy to get, and they don't get reinvestigated periodically as do TSs, although thats supposed to change.
But its all about the dough-re-mi. After my agency was transferred from DOD to OP(iu)M, the asshats who let the ch***s get all our identity info, OPiuM was and is a fee for service agency (imagine that- entrusting the national security to an entity that sees cost effectiveness as more important than safeguarding America !) we no longer did thorough investigations as we were taught by DoD, and God only knows if we will 'pay the piper' more and more because of this errant mindset.
 

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But so did the mental case who killed people at the Washington Navy Yard. Secret clearances (and their equivalent levels in Homeland Security, DOE, etc.), are really nothing, waaaay too easy to get, and they don't get reinvestigated periodically as do TSs, although thats supposed to change.
I remember having my provisional Secret until my investigation was done in the service. Didn't seem like they were giving them away too easily back then. It's a shame that national security has become almost marginalized by issuing clearances to such giant numbers of people (like TSA).
Did agency's ever disregard recommendations that you guys as investigators made on issuance?
 

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He'll when I flew out of LGA they said I need a pat down I insisted on the skinny Muslim girl I state that it is against my religion for a male to touch my body or if they prefer that I would strip down naked right there as it was against my religion to be naked in front of men in a private room.

Hahaha hahaha ha ROTFLMAOPM
 
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I remember having my provisional Secret until my investigation was done in the service. Didn't seem like they were giving them away too easily back then. It's a shame that national security has become almost marginalized by issuing clearances to such giant numbers of people (like TSA).
Did agency's ever disregard recommendations that you guys as investigators made on issuance?
As I said before, investigators are strictly prohibited from making "recommendations." When you think about it, we could easily slant an investigation that way. What I have done more than once, was ask a facility security officer at a defense plant for an interview room the following week. Of course it would be granted but I would then caution the FSO that I would need it for several hours (much longer than the norm) and would they see to it that "so and so's" supervisor knows he would be missing for half the day. these FSOs typically had "connections", many being former LEOs or retired military. Before the week was up they would be calling to say that "so and so" no longer needed a clearance and in fact had "resigned." (There are ways and there are ways.) But a secret clearance has always been a gimmee unless one had known "issues" reflecting on suitability such as substance abuse, and arrest record, lying on the application, still being "in the closet" or adultery leading to the possibility of blackmail, foreign connections etc. My first clearance was in 1972, a Secret, and I didn't go the TS route until 1984. If one looks up some of my input on these threads, you will see that I am a firm believer in background investigations, but not the useless bologna that the NCPD does for a pistol license. My neighbors, coworkers, listed references etc. were never contacted. I don't know if that's to protect my privacy or to avoid having to resolve why some neighbor objected but they really should either poop or get off the pot. Either you perform a background investigation or you just check the criminal records index.
 
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