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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
But these are mine.

View attachment 70640

Finally started reloading. What a pain in the rear end but once it was set up it wasn't too bad.

Learned a few lessons along the way.

Lesson 1. There really is no need to stop every 5 rounds to check the charge.

Lesson 2. When what you think is the finished cartridge comes out the other end and powder is spilling all over the place, it's because you forgot to push forward on the handle to seat the primer cause you were to busy concentrating on measuring every 5th round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, Almost forget lesson 3.

Trim way more brass then you think you'll need. Probably took me 20 cases to get the seating and crimp die set. I should have bought a bullet puller.
 

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I need to get into this. How did you decide on a press?
I'm cheap. I've been using the Lee Anniversary kit, with the hand prime tool, for all of my rifle loads.
Kit, caliber specific case length gauge, caliper, manual, dies all come in under $200.
 

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If you are using a scale to weigh each powder charge, then no, you don't need to check every 5th round. You already checked the charge. Now, if you are using a turret or progressive I would still check a round here and there to make sure the machine is throwing a proper charge. All powders meter different. Some meter great and others need every charge to be checked. Last thing you want is to over or under charge a round. Least worst case, you a grouping all over, worst case, you get hurt or damage your gun.

ETA: Don't load to many at once until you get a chance to try them out. Don't want to go to the range and find out you gun doesn't like that particular load and you have 500 of them loaded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you are using a scale to weigh each powder charge, then no, you don't need to check every 5th round. You already checked the charge. Now, if you are using a turret or progressive I would still check a round here and there to make sure the machine is throwing a proper charge. All powders meter different. Some meter great and others need every charge to be checked. Last thing you want is to over or under charge a round. Least worst case, you a grouping all over, worst case, you get hurt or damage your gun.

ETA: Don't load to many at once until you get a chance to try them out. Don't want to go to the range and find out you gun doesn't like that particular load and you have 500 of them loaded.
Dillon 550B progressive loader. I just want to make sure I don't blow myself up. Loaded these light.

Hornady says using CFE223 Hodgdon powder 24.8 gr for 2800 FPS with the 55gr FMJ-BT With cannelure all the way up to 26.7 gr for 3100 FPS. Max load is 27.4gr I went to 25.3. I only did 85 rounds today.
 

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The Hornady loads highlighted in red as high pressure are conservative compared to the Lee data. No reason to push the high end of the spectrum though.
 

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Dillon 550B progressive loader. I just want to make sure I don't blow myself up. Loaded these light.

Hornady says using CFE223 Hodgdon powder 24.8 gr for 2800 FPS with the 55gr FMJ-BT With cannelure all the way up to 26.7 gr for 3100 FPS. Max load is 27.4gr I went to 25.3. I only did 85 rounds today.
I haven't used CFE223. Not sure if it is a flake or stick (extruded) powder. The stick powders tend to have some irregularities metering. My rule of thumb is, set up the press. Test EVERY round until you get 10 in a row that are spot on. Then check every 10th round to make sure for 100rds. If it stays good through that, load away.

Generally, I don't load more than 15rds of a new load before I test them. Many guns get picky. Might not like a powder, or bullet weight, or charge weight, or any combination. Hate to have to break down a bunch of rounds because my rifle wants to act like a 3 year old at a restaurant.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I haven't used CFE223. Not sure if it is a flake or stick (extruded) powder. The stick powders tend to have some irregularities metering. My rule of thumb is, set up the press. Test EVERY round until you get 10 in a row that are spot on. Then check every 10th round to make sure for 100rds. If it stays good through that, load away.

Generally, I don't load more than 15rds of a new load before I test them. Many guns get picky. Might not like a powder, or bullet weight, or charge weight, or any combination. Hate to have to break down a bunch of rounds because my rifle wants to act like a 3 year old at a restaurant.
This is spherical.
 

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I haven't used CFE223. Not sure if it is a flake or stick (extruded) powder. The stick powders tend to have some irregularities metering. My rule of thumb is, set up the press. Test EVERY round until you get 10 in a row that are spot on. Then check every 10th round to make sure for 100rds. If it stays good through that, load away.

Generally, I don't load more than 15rds of a new load before I test them. Many guns get picky. Might not like a powder, or bullet weight, or charge weight, or any combination. Hate to have to break down a bunch of rounds because my rifle wants to act like a 3 year old at a restaurant.
My Dillon throws Varget better than my RCBS thrower and always within a safe range. It amazes me how well it drops powder. I always check as a precaution,especially when getting setup but that thing is just plain and simple reliable.
 

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From a cost perspective for those who re-load, how much would you estimate you save?

Looks like a fun hobby/way to kill time.
 
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