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I need to hookup my generator to the house panel, which is mounted in the basement. It is a subpanel fed from an outdoor main switch, so I can cut all power for the duration of work, without need to contact PSEG/LIPA. It appears the easies route is to swap the entire panel to a "generator-ready" with a proper interlock like this one. I am fairly confident I can do this myself up to code. The existing panel is already rated at 200A, so the only expansion is the generator hookup.

My question is how I do this without hiring an electrician. I want to do this on my own pace and meanwhile solve a few minor things that the previous owner left for me. Plus, I love a good home project.

To be official, I understand I need a permit and inspections. Can anybody please advise what it will take in terms of time and money?

Specifically, what steps are involved?

How much would the permit and inspections cost?

Of course, there is always a hassle-free "hire an electrician" option - any idea on what it would cost?

Alternatively, I can just do it and hope nobody would notice. Any implications with that (assuming I do it all correcly)? Only the insurance company took a picture of the panel a year ago; may the TOB also have records on the make/model of the panel, etc?

Edit: location is Suffolk/Town of Brookhaven
 

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I had the interlock installed when I remodeled my home. It works just fine. I don’t know how much because it was part of a bigger project. The interlock passed inspection so it must be compliant w code. Best of luck!
 

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The cheapest way is to have your panel feed a three-phase 220v outlet. When the power goes out, you open the main circuit breaker and back-feed the panel thru the outlet.

I am not recommending this; just saying it's the cheapest, and I know some people who have done it without killing anyone.
 

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A what what now?
If I understand correctly, It's a 240 V outlet outside your house. You then attach you generator to it. When power goes out, you should flip your panel off so that power doesn't go up the lines. But since it does require you to do this flip, it's not code, IIRC. The interlock is the way to do this.
 

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If I understand correctly, It's a 240 V outlet outside your house. You then attach you generator to it. When power goes out, you should flip your panel off so that power doesn't go up the lines. But since it does require you to do this flip, it's not code, IIRC. The interlock is the way to do this.
That would be an "inlet", unless you're advocating a double-male "suicide cord".
 

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We had a transfer switch installed. The existing panel stays and the transfer switch installed next to it. The power lines you want to receive power when running on the generator are connected and when you switch to generator power the outside line is disconnected so you're not backfeeding power to the outside line. It was done by a licensed electrician an took about two hours to complete at $600 (this was 20 years ago).
 

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I need to hookup my generator to the house panel, which is mounted in the basement. It is a subpanel fed from an outdoor main switch, so I can cut all power for the duration of work, without need to contact PSEG/LIPA. It appears the easies route is to swap the entire panel to a "generator-ready" with a proper interlock like this one. I am fairly confident I can do this myself up to code. The existing panel is already rated at 200A, so the only expansion is the generator hookup.

My question is how I do this without hiring an electrician. I want to do this on my own pace and meanwhile solve a few minor things that the previous owner left for me. Plus, I love a good home project.

To be official, I understand I need a permit and inspections. Can anybody please advise what it will take in terms of time and money?

Specifically, what steps are involved?

How much would the permit and inspections cost?

Of course, there is always a hassle-free "hire an electrician" option - any idea on what it would cost?

Alternatively, I can just do it and hope nobody would notice. Any implications with that (assuming I do it all correcly)? Only the insurance company took a picture of the panel a year ago; may the TOB also have records on the make/model of the panel, etc?

Edit: location is Suffolk/Town of Brookhaven
Do it the safe way and install a transfer switch. After Hurricane Sandy I bought this switch at Home Depot for less than $300 and wired it in myself in a couple of hours.

459400586cf77af7da3f62dcb487ddee.jpg


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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Reactions: 2edgesword

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Do it the safe way and install a transfer switch. After Hurricane Sandy I bought this switch at Home Depot for less than $300 and wired it in myself in a couple of hours.

459400586cf77af7da3f62dcb487ddee.jpg


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
This is similar to the set-up I have. The power goes out, get the generator out, plug it into the transfer switch, start it, flip the switches on the transfer switch and you have power to the zone you select to be the place where you want emergency power to go.
 
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Reactions: gcloss

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same here as above a number of years back... can't have both online ( gen and lilco ) at same time due to 3 way switch

they also make a ten circuit box

was an hour install
 
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