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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
More specifically, staked screws that should not have been staked.

This is a Savage 65m (I think, it's a Sears branded Savage) 22Mag bolt action. The bolt is only removed after disassembling half the gun. There is a "plug" in the end of the receiver, behind the bolt. It's held in with a screw that is only accessible after removing the trigger assembly. I got that far and find that the screw is staked. It's also munged up pretty good, but in the wrong direction, like someone slipped with a screwdriver while over-tightening it. (Or perhaps they didn't realize the screw was staked and assumed left hand thread?)

I bought this gun used a long time ago. Always operated smoothly. I am able to get oil in all the important places, so I never tried to take it apart. But now the bolt is just a little sticky. I'd really like to clean it up properly. Removing the bolt shouldn't be this much work.

Any ideas?





 

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Putin, the new Ceasar. Veni,Vidi, Vici!
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Ain't no machinist, but that screw looks like it was staked on purpose. It looks like someone tried to unscrew it and screwed instead.
If all else fails get a spray can of Gunscrubber spray the crap out of the bolt in different positions to wash out as much old gunk as possible, maybe some compressed air to dry it out and lubricate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I'm going to take the Russian's advice here. With the trigger assembly out I have reasonable access from the bottom. I'm just going to work from there.

Any other examples of bolt guns with nearly non-removable bolts? I'm no gunsmith but that seems like an absolutely terrible design idea.

Thanks.
 

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#1 Grade A Super Stud
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I think I'm going to take the Russian's advice here. With the trigger assembly out I have reasonable access from the bottom. I'm just going to work from there.

Any other examples of bolt guns with nearly non-removable bolts? I'm no gunsmith but that seems like an absolutely terrible design idea.

Thanks.
Its a cheap gun thing.
 

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Lousy Shot
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Those look like washer head screws. Your "stake mark" appears to be in the edge of the head, not the surrounding material. If that's what I'm seeing in your photo, that mark shouldn't do much at all to keep the screw from coming out. Staking is supposed to stress the material around the screw, causing it to bind. That doesn't appear to be the case, ... in your case.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Those look like washer head screws. Your "stake mark" appears to be in the edge of the head, not the surrounding material. If that's what I'm seeing in your photo, that mark shouldn't do much at all to keep the screw from coming out. Staking is supposed to stress the material around the screw, causing it to bind. That doesn't appear to be the case, ... in your case.

You are correct. However, what is difficult to see in the pictures is that there is a hole under the washer head. So that dent protrudes into the hole below it. I could likely muscle it out of there and would have tried if the screw head was perfect. But considering it's already mashed up, I think I'll leave it alone.
 

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I have a hardened screwdriver with the end of the handle cut off so the shaft can be struck directly, I can file to fit a screw slot tightly and then shock it with a quick rap, usually takes care of seized, spalled, or rusted fasteners. In my experience it's mostly about getting a screwdriver to fit tight and since most screwdrivers have taper, that often means removing the taper.
 

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With care and the proper tools, that screw can be removed. First thing I would do is spray it with some sort of solvent or lubricant like kroil, pbblaster, liquid wrench and let it sit overnight. With a padded vise and the proper screw driver or bit. I think it would not be that hard. I would give it a try. Then if all else fails attack it like others said. Its a small screw and it looks like there is enough material to support a screwdriver. You could also file another slot if you had to.
 

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Be vewwy qwuiet, I'm hunting Giwaffes...
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Most staking is done to stop a screw from loosening on its own. It offers very little resistance when the the fastener is acted upon by a properly fitting tool. Take a steel drift with a nice flat end and give the head of the screw a few sharp raps, not too hard though. This will flatten the nasty damage on the head AND it will loosen the screw, as Will said. Then use a straight-sided screwdriver to back the screw out.

If you feel the staking is offering too much resistance, take a small (tiny) drill bit and drill a hole in the middle of the dimple. That will, obviously, lessen the hold of the stake.
 
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