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This is from a friend of mine. We used to train together. Let me know what you guys think:

Let me throw some thoughts out and see what the brain trust thinks. I know, monday morning quarterbacking, but here goes.


Action begins at 0:30, but it's worth noting the cop's behavior well before the attack begins. Head down, aloof, less-than-ideal situational awareness, sees the threat too late. Remember the OODA loop - Observe-Orient-Decide-Act.

By the time he's Observed the attackers and recognized the threat, they're on top of him. He's reacting and clearly behind the curve. Watch carefully how he keeps stuffing the wallet into his pocket despite being clearly aware of the danger. He's made his decision to fight, but first - let me put my wallet away!

Recall the story of NYPD cops who always heard "police your brass" command after shooting a string at the range. A cop in a real shootout inexplicably started picking up his spent shells while under fire. Don't be an automaton going through the motions!

There's a reason modern LE training uses "officer survival" as an umbrella term for combat tactics. The primary focus is on the combative mindset and the will to survive, whatever it takes.

With that in mind, why the hell would this cop keep shoving the wallet in his pocket instead of immediately going for the sidearm - mere inches away on his belt? He has Decided to fight, but in his mind that has a singular meaning - "pull gun and shoot."

His draw stroke seems well-practiced once he initiates it, and it's possible if he just went for the piece a split second sooner he could've made a difference instead of standing there like a bullet magnet. But that wasn't the best option. Why? Because he has not Oriented himself correctly to the threat.

The cop tries to back away instinctively as the attacker approaches, but he's within grabbing distance of the assailant's gun. The bad guy is inside bad-breath distance. The cop is once again tunnel-focused on his task - at this point the presentation of his pistol- as opposed to disrupting the attack by ANY means necessary.

His support hand is on the stomach - good draw training shows, but that's not what's needed. He stands there totally committed to pull out his piece, as if it'll magically stop the attack once he puts it to use.

Had he tried to close the distance instead, wrap the nearest assailant up in a grapple or at least push his weapon away why he completed his draw stroke - maybe he could've had a chance.

The Act part of the cop's OODA loop isn't the right answer, nor does it come in time. Sad story. Education nonetheless.
 

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he looks like he is very aware of his surroundings, even placing himself between his family and the people that have his attention to his left. He is constantly looking around. It makes me wonder why he was messing with his wallet if he thought the people were a threat. Too bad he didn't take the first shot. Did they know he was police or they just wanted to rob him? And Brazil is a place I will NEVER visit.
R.I.P.
Do they have the death penalty in Brazil?
 

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haha....... yeah they don't have you police your brass until you are done shooting.

Lots of people walking around in life with their head up their butt. It is sad when they get caught up in something and are caught at an even worse disadvantage. Gotta think and act so things become second nature sit facing the door at the restaurant. Hand always near gun on side while I walk I don't notice it but my girlfriend asked me about thought is was weird how when we walk I only swing one arm and the other pretty must hangs close on my right side. Always know what street I am on. Sad fact of the matter is you will always be at a slight disadvantage because you do not know when and if it will happen.
 

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R.I.P. to the officer.
Side-note about Brazil… the Professional Bull Riders had a championship in Brazil years ago. Brazil, USA, Canada, Mexico and Australia each fielded a team. One of the American bull riders said during an interview that his team would be happy if they got out of there alive.
 

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Not sure what the officer was seeing off camera but it did seem he was aware of something that was worth his attention. The initial confrontation happened pretty fast but I'm wondering if part of his thought process wasn't to assess and avoid a confrontation if possible for the safety of his family.
The shooter was on him pretty quickly, no idea how much before we saw him he drew his gun but what we saw was quick.
Sad story, I hope the bad guy got his too.
+1 for Mrs. Cop, she was a bit of a badass protecting her cubs.
 

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I always recommend point shooting for any LEO or Civilian who carries a firearm. Always be prepared, spare ammunition a blade for when the SHTF.
Point shoot...often...different ranges and angles- It can save your life. Ditto on the extra ammo and blade
 

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This is from a friend of mine. We used to train together. Let me know what you guys think:

Let me throw some thoughts out and see what the brain trust thinks. I know, monday morning quarterbacking, but here goes.

http://www.liveleak....=ed4_1443230903
"OODA loop", it's been a while since I heard that term. Still very much viable, though.
These critiques are so subjective, but I'd have to say that I disagree with much of the above.
If the officer knew it was an assassination attempt, then yes, maybe I'd agree with most of the OP's narrative. But if this officer thought that this guy walking at him with a gun pointed at his face was just there to rob him/the store, then no, I disagree with the narrative. You MIGHT - MIGHT want to burry your police ID, go along and be a good witness. Especially if your family is there. It would depend on what the officer felt at the time - not what we saw in a video. Obviously if he felt he was about to be shot, he would try to defend himself/family. It appears to me that's what he did.

I don't know of anyone who would be able to defend against an unexpected assassination while waiting for food at a local restaurant. Police officers here arrest violent gang members every day. They get threatened every day. I'm not too sure what an off-duty cop, sitting on line at McDonalds with his son, could do if a 'patron' walked in, pulled a gun and assassinated him. Even if for some reason he's in the elevated "Condition Orange" (another old term), there's only so much you can do when the bad guy has the drop on you and you're his close-range target.

But yes, maybe he could have recognized the threat earlier (we don't know that from the video), dropped his wallet, drew his firearm while stepping out of the line of fire of his family and delivered shots to the gunman so effectively as to not get shot and to stop him.
 
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Sad video.

And FWIW the "cops killed picking up brass" or "found dead with brass in their hands/pockets" is a myth. It's never happened. It's primarily been attributed to the CHP Newhall Massacre but I think most folks around here have heard some NYPD permutation of it. Newhall was didcounted. Any other cited instances have proved unfounded.
 

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Sad video.

And FWIW the "cops killed picking up brass" or "found dead with brass in their hands/pockets" is a myth. It's never happened. It's primarily been attributed to the CHP Newhall Massacre but I think most folks around here have heard some NYPD permutation of it. Newhall was didcounted. Any other cited instances have proved unfounded.
Back in June of 1986 a rookie NYPD officer was killed reloading his service revolver. Training has greatly improved since that tragic event.
Police have learned through dash cam videos shown through In Service and Street Survival. The friendly cop murdered for calling the driver Sir even when getting shot . Sadly many cops aren't trained properly in being prepared for a gun fight!
 

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Back in June of 1986 a rookie NYPD officer was killed reloading his service revolver. Training has greatly improved since that tragic event.
Police have learned through dash cam videos shown through In Service and Street Survival. The friendly cop murdered for calling the driver Sir even when getting shot . Sadly many cops aren't trained properly in being prepared for a gun fight!
I became very good friends with his younger brother not long after Scott's murder. The NYC PBA used his death to finally get speed-loaders authorized.
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Police Officer
Scott A. Gadell
New York City Police Department, New York

End of Watch: Saturday, June 28, 1986


Bio & Incident Details

Age: 22
Tour: 11 months
Badge # 27037
Military veteran

Cause: Gunfire
Weapon: Handgun; 9 mm
Offender: Sentenced to 25 years to life
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Police Officer Scott Gadell was shot and killed while he and his partner were in a foot pursuit of a man wanted for threatening another man with a pistol.

The officers chased the suspect into an alley and exchanged shots. As Officer Gadell was reloading his revolver the suspect was able to come up behind him and shot and killed him. The suspect fled but was apprehended two months later.

The suspect, who was charged with a drug related murder in 1985, was out on bail. He was convicted of Officer Gadell's murder and sentenced to 25 years to life. He has a parole hearing in April of 2013.

Officer Gadell was a U.S. Army Reserve veteran and had served with the New York City Police Department for one year. He was survived by his parents.
 

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It looks to me like the attackers gun didn't become visible until he was five or six feet away from the victim. Prior to that no clue that this was going to be a deadly force situation. The gun in hand, point beats gun in holster every time. The only thing I can say, sitting in the comfort of my easy chair, is that going for his gun was probably not the thing to do at that distance, within arms reach of the attackers gun. There is no way you're going to get a shot off first in that situation and as difficult as it is making the decision to redirect the weapon and possibly gain control of the attackers weapon hand (better yet arm) may have been the better decision. That said you have family and other individuals that could end up getting shot should you redirect the weapon so in my mind there are no good alternatives in this situation. Someone was going to get shot by this attacker. As someone else said, this appears to be more of an assassination attempt then armed robbery and even presidents, with all of the security surrounding them, have been assassinated.
 
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