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Besides the paint coming off, whats the correct way of fixing this? Should i epoxy the wood at the bottom or should i get those composite (non-wood) trim boards and replace everything? Or can the bottom half be cut and replaced with new trim? this is the garage door trim (pic 2 & 3 are the same side)Thanks all

Wood Road surface Asphalt Floor Trunk


Wood Asphalt Road surface Floor Automotive tire


Automotive tire Road surface Asphalt Wood Tape measure
 

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CertainTeed Restoration Millwork. Hands down. If it's in the shade and wet, eventually it'll turn green like anything else but then just spray it with some bleach solution.

I install a vinyl J-channel wrapped around the back edge as a seal for the garage door, which works a million times better than that wooden stop with the rubber strip that eventually falls off. Now everything is rot and bug proof plastic. Although I note your stop appears to be vinyl.

Florence lumber sells RM
 

· airbrushart
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You can cut it out do a dutchman, scrape off all the old paint etc, or do the smart thing and replace everything at one time, now you don't have to spend 20 hours of your time for a couple of hours. Composite comes primed, however a second coat won't hurt, pre paint on some saw horses, install, paint done.
 
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· Powderfinger
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Eliminate any wood to soil contact . Most damage is caused by wood absorbing moisture like a sponge and then falls apart over time. To save existing trim cut off bottom 3" and seal crack in cement apron , where water will run off and not collect . You can see in the photo that it is separating in squares on the bottom. Typical signs of water rot.
 

· Grand Poobah
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Eliminate any wood to soil contact . Most damage is caused by wood absorbing moisture like a sponge and then falls apart over time. To save existing trim cut off bottom 3" and seal crack in cement apron , where water will run off and not collect . You can see in the photo that it is separating in squares on the bottom. Typical signs of water rot.
I think this is exactly what's happening.
After you cut off the trim and seal the concrete or asphalt you can get a piece of pressure treated 1 x 4 and cut a piece to use as a base corner or architectural detail piece. It looks good and won't rot or act as a water absorber which regular wood will.
Then prime it, caulk it and paint the whole thing.
 

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Ever try to paint pressure treated lumber? If it worked put for you, great. For most people, in most cases, it doesn't work so hot. Unless you let it age for like a YEAR first to dry out. Then it works *sometimes*. meaning you can get paint to stick to it for at least five years.
 

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I am a contractor, and I gave up on wooden jambs for garage doors after Azek and the like became available. As stated, pressure treated is bothersome to finish. The down sides to Azek are a lot of expansion and contraction seasonally compared to wood, and the edges are not smooth on some brands.
 

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all the white work on my house is plastic , no painting or rot . Sometimes for small repairs I just dutch / patch / paint . Depends on the overall condition of the house and what the general plan is for any upgrades on the house .
 

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CPVC- no paint. You are replacing wood that needs to be painted, you want to keep painting? Somebody had a hard time keeping that wood painted in the first place or it would not look like that. I use the Drydex spackle to fill the holes my finish nailer leaves and it's a very good match.
Although expensive, this is the best option. You can leave it in water forever and it will never rot.

I wonder if you can glue it rather than nail?

Ps - see how the white trim / gasket piece next to it is holding up? I'll bet that is some sort of pvc / vinyl.

Home Depot has a garage kit with all the layers (or at least had a book outlining all the parts) in the trm section. I've been meaning to do that for my garage.
 

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When using Azek - don't forget to use Stainless Nails when using in exterior applications. Don't want rust stains or streaks down the road. And yes that stuff expands and contracts like a son of a female dog. I put up some brickmold trim around my garage door when it was stupid hot out. All the joints were poo perfect and nice and tight. In winter. I have every bit of a 1/4 or more gap on each end.
 

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When using Azek - don't forget to use Stainless Nails when using in exterior applications. Don't want rust stains or streaks down the road. And yes that stuff expands and contracts like a son of a female dog. I put up some brickmold trim around my garage door when it was stupid hot out. All the joints were poo perfect and nice and tight. In winter. I have every bit of a 1/4 or more gap on each end.
if you use azek don't butt the joints , undercut at 30 degrees
 

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if you use azek don't butt the joints , undercut at 30 degrees
did that on the overhead piece as the garage is a a bit over 16' wide. Forgot what angle I used but I did use an angle for that seam. Still a large gap in winter, but it's better than painting all the time!

I stupidly didn't undercut the corners so those 2 spots are drastically noticeable in winter.
 

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I glue the stuff (CPVC) together with CLEAR polyurethane glue, there are a couple of tricks you can use to get around the expansion. One is to leave the top 18" or so of the side casings with no mechanical fasteners to the jambs, and instead attach them to the head casing- then instead of an ugly gap, you get a much less noticeable change in reveal between the jamb and casing. Biscuits work in CPVC, at least the CRM, and so do corrugated fasteners- although I realize that outside of upholstery shops, not a lot of folks have a gun for these. Neither of these were mentioned in the coursework when I got my Master Craftsman Certification for that material- I think the manufacturer makes the stuff and kind of just lets individuals come up with their own fabrication techniques, kind of like StarBoard and the opposite of the way DuPont trains installers of Corian- they have a very long list of do "nots".

I am not a huge fan of Azek, and don't like that gray composite crap that HD sells at all. By the time I finish the latter, there is really little to no cost savings for my client.
 

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If it's actually vinyl/PVC you can cement it with clear PVC primer and cement.
That (solvent cement) does not work well with cellular PVC, imagine trying to glue two pieces of Styrofoam together with acetone. It'll tack initially, but it won't be strong. Polyurethane glue expands into it and grips it really well. Plenty of people have tried solvent cements, it just doesn't work as well. Azek makes their own glue but I'd rate it as "fair". The original Gorilla glue will create a brown stain as it ages. The newer clear stuff doesn't.
 
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