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I just got an inspection and oil change at the dealer. All went well. They have 2 recommendations.

1- Putting nitro in the tires. I'm not familiar with this. So I holding off on that.

2- Engine flush. Everything I heard about this was that it's a waste of time and money. Synthetic oil is called for in my car. What are the pros and cons of both.

So before you ask I have a Ford and they said the oil was dark. Not dirty.
 

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Automatic message - This topic has been moved from Chit-Chat to Car / Truck talk

1) Don't waste your money. Air is something like 78% nitrogen. In normal passenger car usage, you will not notice a difference, or reap enough benefit to justify the cost or hassle.
http://www.longislan...n-filled-tires/
I can get all the nitrogen I would want or need for free, and don't use it.

2) Don't waste your money. If you are using synthetic oil, and changing it at the recommended interval, pretty safe bet the inside of your engine is pretty clean. Synthetic is capable of maintaining film strength and viscosity at much higher temps, and for a longer duration than dino oil.
 

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nitro doesn't expand and contract as much as regular air. So when its hot the pressure will not go up and when its cold it wont go down. My view is its not really worth it, if someone offers to put nitro in for free then go ahead what the heck.
 

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The air we breathe (and put in tires) is over 70% Nitrogen as it is. That said, it does make a small difference in reaction to temp and oxidation potential on the inside of the tires. I have filled everything from bicycles to the big singl;e rear tires of a semi with nitrogen but it's easy for me to pick up industrial cylinders and regulate them down. Engine flush? Since you are using synthetic oil I can't see any reason to do this and normally you wouldn't do it on ANY engine as it stirs up more problems than it solves

 
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My cars (SUV's) are not finely tuned performance cars. I don't know what you have or what conditions you expect to use it under, but I doubt it's anything more than them selling BS.
If my 92 Jeep needs nitro, it would be in the form of a pill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
1. Go with a 78% nitrogen fill on your tires. Works well and doesn't cost any more.

2. I've always heard this is one of those dealer upsells. YMMV. As far as synthetic, I've switched, I like it. Increases the intervals between changes, just keep an eye on it.

How many miles on the oil that was dark?
There was about 4800 miles. With synthetic it calls for 5000 between intervals.
 

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I just got an inspection and oil change at the dealer. All went well. They have 2 recommendations.

1- Putting nitro in the tires. I'm not familiar with this. So I holding off on that.

2- Engine flush. Everything I heard about this was that it's a waste of time and money. Synthetic oil is called for in my car. What are the pros and cons of both.

So before you ask I have a Ford and they said the oil was dark. Not dirty.
They sell nitro as an option because it's more stable during temp changes. Studies claim you can save money on fuel because you shouldn't have under inflated tires. I've also seen studies showing nitro keeps moisture from forming inside the tires causing them to rot from the inside out. The downside is you can't add air as needed. Air is free. (almost)

Change the oil regularly and you shouldn't need a flush. I don't use synthetic oil. Liquid dinosaurs works for me.
 

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There was about 4800 miles. With synthetic it calls for 5000 between intervals.
Dark oil is fine. That's what happens, it's never going to look like it did out of the bottle. Dark is also a subjective term they can use to try and upsell you. Like telling someone a beer is "more refreshing". Now if it has debris in it, then you should investigate further, but I wouldn't worry.
 

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Check your owners manual for necessary maintenance. All dealers make money by selling service.

A Dodge dealer tried to sell me a 20,000 mile service. I asked him how come the owners manual doesn't call for a 20,000 mile service. End of conversation....
 

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Check your owners manual for necessary maintenance. All dealers make money by selling service.

A Dodge dealer tried to sell me a 20,000 mile service. I asked him how come the owners manual doesn't call for a 20,000 mile service. End of conversation....
Was it in Amityville? All dealers make up their own WhateverK service, always ask if it's in the manual
 

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There was about 4800 miles. With synthetic it calls for 5000 between intervals.
Really? Do you have a turbo? My experience has been that the recommended interval is 3,000~5,000 if YOU pay for it and 7,500~10,000 or more if THEY pay for it. What does the oil brand website recommend? Edmunds article suggests:
Oil chemistry and engine technology have evolved tremendously in recent years, but you'd never know it from the quick-change behavior of American car owners. Driven by an outdated 3,000-mile oil change commandment, they are unnecessarily spending millions of dollars and spilling an ocean of contaminated waste oil.
The majority of automakers today call for oil changes at either 7,500 or 10,000 miles, and the interval can go as high as 15,000 miles in some cars. Yet this wasteful cycle continues largely because the automotive service industry, while fully aware of the technological advances, continues to preach the 3,000-mile gospel as a way to keep the service bays busy. As a result, even the most cautious owners are dumping their engine oil twice as often as their service manuals recommend.
While the car-servicing industry is clear about its reasons for believing in the 3,000-mile oil change, customers cling to it only because they're largely unaware of advances in automotive technology. Among 2013 models, the majority of automakers call for oil changes at either 7,500 or 10,000 miles based on a normal service schedule, more than double the traditional 3,000-mile interval. The longest oil change interval is 15,000 miles for all Jaguar vehicles. The shortest oil change interval is 5,000 miles in some Hyundai and Kia models with turbo engines and Toyota vehicles that call for non-synthetic oil. Toyota has been shifting its fleet to 10,000-mile oil change intervals using synthetic oil.
 

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Really? Do you have a turbo? My experience has been that the recommended interval is 3,000~5,000 if YOU pay for it and 7,500~10,000 or more if THEY pay for it. What does the oil brand website recommend? Edmunds article suggests:
Oil chemistry and engine technology have evolved tremendously in recent years, but you'd never know it from the quick-change behavior of American car owners. Driven by an outdated 3,000-mile oil change commandment, they are unnecessarily spending millions of dollars and spilling an ocean of contaminated waste oil.
The majority of automakers today call for oil changes at either 7,500 or 10,000 miles, and the interval can go as high as 15,000 miles in some cars. Yet this wasteful cycle continues largely because the automotive service industry, while fully aware of the technological advances, continues to preach the 3,000-mile gospel as a way to keep the service bays busy. As a result, even the most cautious owners are dumping their engine oil twice as often as their service manuals recommend.
While the car-servicing industry is clear about its reasons for believing in the 3,000-mile oil change, customers cling to it only because they're largely unaware of advances in automotive technology. Among 2013 models, the majority of automakers call for oil changes at either 7,500 or 10,000 miles based on a normal service schedule, more than double the traditional 3,000-mile interval. The longest oil change interval is 15,000 miles for all Jaguar vehicles. The shortest oil change interval is 5,000 miles in some Hyundai and Kia models with turbo engines and Toyota vehicles that call for non-synthetic oil. Toyota has been shifting its fleet to 10,000-mile oil change intervals using synthetic oil.
My explorer has a pesky rear main seal leak, it kind of changes the oil automatically for me.
 

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The air we breathe (and put in tires) is over 70% Nitrogen as it is. That said, it does make a small difference in reaction to temp and oxidation potential on the inside of the tires.
I too use a 78% turbo special ultra premium nitrogen blend both in my tires and my lungs!

 
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