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· Banned
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my boss asked me if I could build a tow behind smoker. I said "I'll give anything a shot". It started with a 120gal vertical propane tank. It was mounted to a harbor freight trailer. The firebox is made from 1/4" plate steel. It is a reverse flow smoker so inside is a baffle plate welded in. 2 racks that both slide out. Also added a wood box and a propane pot heater. I will be adding a work station to the left of the tank soon. A lot of time and research went into this. It has come out better than we ever thought. I built myself a t-style drum smoker also....but that's another thread. So here are the pics. Feel free to critique.
 

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· Sockdolager
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Not a critique, just a question as to why the firebox and smokestack are on the same side. I've usually seen them across from each other with the theory being the smoke would be forced to cross the smoker and exit the other side.
 
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· Zombtac Operator
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Not a critique, just a question as to why the firebox and smokestack are on the same side. I've usually seen them across from each other with the theory being the smoke would be forced to cross the smoker and exit the other side.
Could be a reverse flow offset, a very popular and prevailing style in competitive Q, for even cooking.

Edit: OP actually states that it is in OP


Automotive tire Auto part Automotive exterior Musical instrument accessory Wheel


Very cool build. Something I'd always wanted to do. I'd change the color of the pig emblem though and make it meaner

You know me with my custom builds, etc. I always like to dress things up and trick them out (maybe weld on some camo pigs holding AR-15s
) I like simplicity in design, however. Maybe add a hot box over the firebox (though it looks like you prepped the metal) not necessarily a stack like in the design above but if you had the steel or a cabinet a small hot/warming box above the firebox would fit and is a nice feature in the trailer rigs.
 

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Not a critique, just a question as to why the firebox and smokestack are on the same side. I've usually seen them across from each other with the theory being the smoke would be forced to cross the smoker and exit the other side.
Just guessing but he may have it ducted to flow underneath going in and back across the top on the way out. Nice work. Where's the little side tray burner thingy for heating the basting sauce and hors d'ouvres? You could paint it up like a pig with Cuomo's face on it.
 
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· Sockdolager
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Ahh very cool! That's a new one on me. What's the advantage of it crossing over like that?
 

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I'm familiar with that parking lot
 

· Zombtac Operator
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Ahh very cool! That's a new one on me. What's the advantage of it crossing over like that?
Even distribution of heat and smoke from the firebox. In the direct offset stickburners I use we always add tuning plates in the cooking chamber to deflect the heat, as the chamber is always hotter on the firebox side (sometimes considerably more). It's a trickier process dialing the plates (steel with perforations, more or thicker plates towards the firebox side, etc.) to even out the heat in the chamber.

The reverse flow --by design--allows for better and more even distribution of the heat and smoke (it's a good air flow design).



Now this is a cheap offset just for illustration, in my 11 ga steel walled welded offset there are no leaks and the airflow is better but you still get say 50-90 degrees hotter in the firebox half of the chamber, vs. the stack side. With tuning plates you can control that in a good direct offset, but with the reverse flow you don't need to worry about it.


Tuning plates to even out heat entering the chamber in a direct offset stickburner
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Destro did a great job answering. Yes, it is a reverse flow smoker. This allows for more even heating and smoking of the food. In a standard smoker, the heat and smoke enters on one end of the cooking chamber and exits the other. This causes the meats near the firebox to cook faster than the meats on the exhaust side. This is one of the major problems in the Brinkmans. However, there is a simple mod for the Brinkmans the fix this. When I get a chance I will make a thread about my drum smoker. I have been using for a month or so. It uses 2 55gal drums. I have another 120gal propane tank at work ready to be built. In fact, a friend and I came up with a smoker design that can be made into any size smoker. We plan on making some and starting to sell them. Anyone interested in being a first to own, custom smoker, let me know.
 

· Zombtac Operator
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Destro did a great job answering. Yes, it is a reverse flow smoker. This allows for more even heating and smoking of the food. In a standard smoker, the heat and smoke enters on one end of the cooking chamber and exits the other. This causes the meats near the firebox to cook faster than the meats on the exhaust side. This is one of the major problems in the Brinkmans. However, there is a simple mod for the Brinkmans the fix this. When I get a chance I will make a thread about my drum smoker. I have been using for a month or so. It uses 2 55gal drums. I have another 120gal propane tank at work ready to be built. In fact, a friend and I came up with a smoker design that can be made into any size smoker. We plan on making some and starting to sell them. Anyone interested in being a first to own, custom smoker, let me know.
For some advice on selling...I would go with a much longer cooking chamber. Most pitmasters really don't use the second shelf too much (as it will be much hotter) and grate level is where it's at. I like the design and look but if i were to buy a trailer unit It would need to be much longer (it's not just about cooking space sq inch wise, the bottom grate has to be long enough for whole hog and volume, the top grate is fine but not as important).

I was looking for a larger pit (trailered even if the price point is right) and the problem is there aren't any pitmakers up here and shipping costs from the South kill you (yoder wanted 300+ shipping for a small patio pit I was looking at). If you could make a bare bones pit at a value (i and many others don't need it to be pretty like a Jambo) I'd be interested, but it would have to be a longer chamber (maybe even dual-doored) otherwise a patio unit can compare. I think the barebones look at a value (where you can profit of course) would be a competitive market for you. I personally hate the chrome and shiny car paint look of the Jambos, though Jaime builds excellent pits for competitive pitmasters. I'm not interested in paying for all that glitter and finishing work, the rustic, industrial look works for me as long as it cooks. Just my friendly 2 cents as someone enthusiastic about Q and something to consider. I wish you luck!

(and the tuning plates aren't just a brinkmann thing...it's any direct offset that needs heat tuning plates, including $3,000+ yoders or langs. Though they often supply thick tuning plates. reverse flow is the predominant stick burner used in comps though).
 

· Sockdolager
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Thanks for the details guys!

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