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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A very skilled and knowledgeable friend, a former trainer and supervisor for the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department, insists that S&W revolvers are prone to going out of time more rapidly when subjected to extensive use by left-handed shooters. He further claims that they can be specifically timed to avoid this problem but that Colt DA revolvers are not susceptible to this problem and, at one time, were specifically recommended to left-handed deputies on LASD for that reason.

I can't figure out why this would be the case. Anyone else know anything about this?

(Cross-posted at EOTAC Forum)
 

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If fired with two hands, a lefty shooter will pull to the right [edit a bunch of gibberish] Ok, try this again.
Lefty pulls gun slightly to the right while S&W cylinder turns counterclockwise. Maybe that has an effect over time. I dunno...
Colts rotate clockwise, so the opposite would happen with righties shooting Colts. What else is different in the Colt/S&W design.
Was it a certain model of S&W (which frame?)
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Alogusz said:
If fired with two hands, a lefty shooter will pull to the right [edit a bunch of gibberish] Ok, try this again.
Lefty pulls gun slightly to the right while S&W cylinder turns counterclockwise. Maybe that has an effect over time. I dunno...
Colts rotate clockwise, so the opposite would happen with righties shooting Colts. What else is different in the Colt/S&W design.
Many things differ between Colt DA and S&W revolvers, none of which would explain this claim to me:
  • Because the Colt cylinder rotates clockwise, it is pressed into the frame by the hand. To some extent, the counter-clockwise rotation of the S&W cylinder presses it away from the frame, into the mechanism that locks it in place. This served some to argue that this made the Colt a more accurate target gun.
  • Colt DA revolvers use two hands to rotate the cylinder, with the second hand locking the cylinder more firmly in place as the trigger nears the end of its stroke.
  • Several other aspects of the Colt lockwork differ from that of the S&W, whether the older V-spring Colts or the later coil-spring ones.
  • Colt DA revolvers use longer "guides" into the locking cuts on the cylinder.
Was it a certain model of S&W (which frame?)
LASD was issuing S&W M-15 (K-frame) revolvers. My friend claims that the lead firearms instructor at the academy was advising the lefties to buy a Colt Trooper when they graduated. At that time, it would have been the coil-spring Trooper Mark III that was in production.

My friend seems to believe that this principle applies to backup guns as well, which implies that a lefty would get longer-lasting performance from a V-spring Colt DS or Cobra than from a J-frame S&W.

I have always been under the impression that the V-spring Colts, with their intricate lockwork, tended to shoot out of time more readily than the simpler S&W revolvers.

I believe that Colt revolvers have been favored by lefties because it is easier to pull the cylinder release back with the index finger of the left hand, particularly if you have to operate one-handed, on a Colt, as opposed to having to push it forward with some part of the left hand with a S&W.
 
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