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Major John Glen, piloting a F8U Crusader touched down at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn just 3 hours, 23 minutes, 8.4 seconds after leaving Los Angeles.
https://www.flyingleathernecks.org/john-glenns-project-bullet-f8u-crusader-the-rest-of-the-story/Significant accomplishments in aviation and astronautics during the mid-1950s and early 1960s were regarded as major news events. This was certainly true on July 16, 1957 when Senator (then Marine Major) John Glenn became a national hero by setting a new transcontinental air speed record. On that day, Major Glenn flew an F8U-1P Crusader (BuNo 144608) from NAS Los Alamitos, California nonstop to NAS Floyd Bennett Field, New York at a record speed of 725.55 mph. The flight lasted just three hours, 23 minutes and 8.4 seconds, which beat the previous record holder (an F-100F Super Sabre) by 15 minutes. In total, four pilots would break the transcontinental air speed record in 1957.
John Glenn's record setting flight was certainly not a publicity stunt. The purpose of the Project Bullet flight was to prove that the Pratt & Whitney J-57 engine could tolerate an extended period at combat power - full afterburner - without damage. After the flight, Pratt & Whitney engineers disassembled the J-57 and, based on their examination, determined that the engine could perform in extended combat situations. Accordingly, all power limitations on J-57s were lifted from that day forward.
On July 16, 1957, Major Glenn secured his place in aviation history and became an inspiration to thousands of young people in the United States. Project Bullet secured his reputation as one of the country's top test pilots. He was awarded his fifth Distinguished Flying Cross and, shortly thereafter, was named to NASA's first astronaut class.
Unlike John Glenn, few pilots have had an opportunity to break or set significant aviation records. Undoubtedly, these aviators have a "special spot in their heart" for the aircraft that helped them obtain their place in history.
 

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Every so often on the carrier the Navy would put on an air show for foreign dignitaries. One of the performances was a fly-by of an F14, flight deck level alongside the ship.

It was like a ghost - no sound. Then the boom and the ship would shake.

Paul
 
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