Long Island Shooters Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Now an Ex NYer
Joined
·
24,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/2012/02/29/house-democrats-have-left-the-iowa-capitol-in-protest-in-an-undisclosed-location/
I guess if you don't like it, you throw a tantrum and go hide...

gun legislation [includes video]
3:50 PM, Feb 29, 2012 | by Jason Clayworth |
Comments
Categories: Iowa Politics Insider

A
A

This story is by Jason Noble with additional reporting by Jason Clayworth.

Update at 4:35 p.m.: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Democrats will return to the House chambers and are now prepared to debate the gun legislation and other bills that have been delayed by the Democrats' absence for more than six hours.

Iowa House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy addresses reporters Wednesday afternoon after Democrats returned from an hours-long walkout over a dispute regarding gun bill debates. (Rodney White/The Register)

In a press conference moments ago, McCarthy said the Democrats walked out of the Capitol in protest this morning, but spent the day holding an "off-campus" caucus meeting to work through their position on the gun legislation. He reiterated his contention that Republicans sprung debate on the controversial bills on Democrats at the last moment, when they had no time to prepare amendments or develop a debate strategy.

He also said he expected Republicans to replace the language currently found in a proposed constitutional amendment with much stronger wording that would nullify many existing gun laws. That prompted the flight from the Capitol.

"This morning we found out mid-morning that they intended to alter the Iowa constitution today to eliminate all gun laws. All gun laws regarding transporting, carrying, acquiring. All gun laws, gone. …" McCarthy said.

Now, after meeting extensively, he said, the Democrats are ready to proceed on the bills.

"So now we're going to go up and we'll have the debate," he said. "I don't know what order of the debate they'll have, but we're going to go up and have a debate so people know what kind of agenda that Republicans are pursuing. We're still here. It's still daylight."

The House reconvened at about 4:40 p.m., and opened debate, although the gun legislation was not immediately brought up.

Update at 3:45 p.m.: House Democrats will hold a press conference at the Capitol at 4:15 p.m.

Update at 3:20 p.m.: House Speaker Kraig Paulsen met with reporters at about 3 p.m. to say he had spoken by phone with Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, but received no word as to where the Democrats were or when they would return to the Capitol.

Republicans will remain "at ease" in the House chambers for the time being, Paulsen said, in hopes that the Democrats will return yet today.

"The right thing for them to do is to get back here and do the work that Iowans sent us here to do," he said. "We'll be patient a little bit longer and see if they can make a decision here and give me something more definitive to work with."

Paulsen said that McCarthy suggested during the four or five minute call that Democrats would return if Republicans tabled the two gun bills that prompted them to leave. But that's a non-starter for the GOP. "Someone doesn't get to have a tantrum and leave the Capitol and all the sudden we're changing the debate schedule. That's not how that works," Paulsen said.

Paulsen said he was not certain yet how he would proceed in the hours to come. His could decide to adjourn for the day at any time, or to remain convened through the evening and night.

"It wouldn't be the first time," he said when asked about the potential for remaining in session over night.

Original post:

Iowa House Democrats protested Republican plans to debate two gun measures on Wednesday by leaving the state Capitol and refusing to return. As of 2 p.m., the 40-member Democratic caucus had been gone for about four hours.

The walkout has disrupted nearly a day's worth of legislative business and garnered national attention likening it to recent protests against Republican priorities by Democrats in Wisconsin and elsewhere.

At issue are bills seeking to broaden Iowa's "Castle Doctrine" allowing individuals to defend themselves with deadly force and a proposal to write the right to bear arms into the state constitution.

More at web site
 

·
Now an Ex NYer
Joined
·
24,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/2012/02/29/house-democrats-have-left-the-iowa-capitol-in-protest-in-an-undisclosed-location/
I guess if you don't like it, you throw a tantrum and go hide...

gun legislation [includes video]
3:50 PM, Feb 29, 2012 | by Jason Clayworth |
Comments
Categories: Iowa Politics Insider

A
A

This story is by Jason Noble with additional reporting by Jason Clayworth.

Update at 4:35 p.m.: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Democrats will return to the House chambers and are now prepared to debate the gun legislation and other bills that have been delayed by the Democrats' absence for more than six hours.

Iowa House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy addresses reporters Wednesday afternoon after Democrats returned from an hours-long walkout over a dispute regarding gun bill debates. (Rodney White/The Register)

In a press conference moments ago, McCarthy said the Democrats walked out of the Capitol in protest this morning, but spent the day holding an "off-campus" caucus meeting to work through their position on the gun legislation. He reiterated his contention that Republicans sprung debate on the controversial bills on Democrats at the last moment, when they had no time to prepare amendments or develop a debate strategy.

He also said he expected Republicans to replace the language currently found in a proposed constitutional amendment with much stronger wording that would nullify many existing gun laws. That prompted the flight from the Capitol.

"This morning we found out mid-morning that they intended to alter the Iowa constitution today to eliminate all gun laws. All gun laws regarding transporting, carrying, acquiring. All gun laws, gone. …" McCarthy said.

Now, after meeting extensively, he said, the Democrats are ready to proceed on the bills.

"So now we're going to go up and we'll have the debate," he said. "I don't know what order of the debate they'll have, but we're going to go up and have a debate so people know what kind of agenda that Republicans are pursuing. We're still here. It's still daylight."

The House reconvened at about 4:40 p.m., and opened debate, although the gun legislation was not immediately brought up.

Update at 3:45 p.m.: House Democrats will hold a press conference at the Capitol at 4:15 p.m.

Update at 3:20 p.m.: House Speaker Kraig Paulsen met with reporters at about 3 p.m. to say he had spoken by phone with Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, but received no word as to where the Democrats were or when they would return to the Capitol.

Republicans will remain "at ease" in the House chambers for the time being, Paulsen said, in hopes that the Democrats will return yet today.

"The right thing for them to do is to get back here and do the work that Iowans sent us here to do," he said. "We'll be patient a little bit longer and see if they can make a decision here and give me something more definitive to work with."

Paulsen said that McCarthy suggested during the four or five minute call that Democrats would return if Republicans tabled the two gun bills that prompted them to leave. But that's a non-starter for the GOP. "Someone doesn't get to have a tantrum and leave the Capitol and all the sudden we're changing the debate schedule. That's not how that works," Paulsen said.

Paulsen said he was not certain yet how he would proceed in the hours to come. His could decide to adjourn for the day at any time, or to remain convened through the evening and night.

"It wouldn't be the first time," he said when asked about the potential for remaining in session over night.

Original post:

Iowa House Democrats protested Republican plans to debate two gun measures on Wednesday by leaving the state Capitol and refusing to return. As of 2 p.m., the 40-member Democratic caucus had been gone for about four hours.

The walkout has disrupted nearly a day's worth of legislative business and garnered national attention likening it to recent protests against Republican priorities by Democrats in Wisconsin and elsewhere.

At issue are bills seeking to broaden Iowa's "Castle Doctrine" allowing individuals to defend themselves with deadly force and a proposal to write the right to bear arms into the state constitution.

More at web site
 

·
Now an Ex NYer
Joined
·
24,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More...

http://iowastatedaily.com/news/article_0f03080a-6737-11e1-aa2d-001871e3ce6c.html

Gun laws bring big change to Iowa

Story
Comments

Posted: Monday, March 5, 2012 8:49 pm | Updated: 10:20 pm, Tue Mar 6, 2012.

By Katherine Klingseis, [email protected], Katelynn McCollough, [email protected], Briana Haguewood, [email protected] | 0 comments

Twenty-two bills pertaining to weapons and firearms have been introduced to the Iowa Legislature.

The bills introduce legislation involving everything from allowing citizens who feel threatened to defend themselves to a house joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Iowa Constitution ensuring Iowans the right to bear arms.

The Iowa "stand your ground" act will allow individuals who feel threatened to defend themselves, where the law previously requires them to flee the situation if possible. This act also will keep individuals who are not found criminally liable after defending themselves from facing civil lawsuits.

"'Stand your ground' states that if you are attacked at a place you have a right to be, you do not have to retreat ... you can stand your ground," said Dave Workman, director of communications at the Second Amendment Foundation. "It allows a person to fight back against an attack. You can resist."

Workman said stand your ground acts are often confused with the Castle doctrine. However, he explained that they are different than the Castle doctrine.

"Castle doctrine deals specifically with defending your home," Workman said. "'Stand your ground' extends that to beyond your doorstep."

House Joint Resolution 2009 proposes an amendment to the Iowa Constitution that states Iowans rights to keep and bear arms. The amendment to Article 1 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa would state citizens' "right to acquire, possess, transport, carry, transfer, and use arms."

House Joint Resolution 2009 passed in the House last Wednesday.

Workman said the right to keep and bear arms is important because it relates to the natural human right of self-preservation. He said that many gun prohibitionists don't understand guns and are simply afraid of them.

"They simply see firearms as tools of evil," Workman said. "Some people in the gun prohibitions movement are uneasy with the fact that people with firearms can actually exist."

The United States is unique in that it has a constitutional provision in the Bill of Rights that recognizes the right to keep and bear arms, Workman said. However, Iowa is one of six states that does not currently have an enumerated right to keep and bear arms stated in its constitution, according to the Iowa Firearms Coalition.

The Iowa constitutional amendment not only specifically declares the right of individuals to get and carry firearms, but also prohibits fees and limits restrictions related to gun use.

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a nonprofit organization, gives 100-point scorecards to each state on the strength of their gun laws.

The Brady Campaign gave Iowa a scorecard of 7 points out of 100, stating that "Iowa has weak gun laws that help feed the illegal gun market and allow the sale of guns without background checks."

As a result of the proposition, those who choose to exercise their right to bear arms would not be required to submit mandatory licensing, registration or special taxation, and any other restriction would be "subject to scrutiny."

Thirty-six House Republicans are co-sponsoring the measure, including House Speaker Kraig Paulsen.

Paulsen has stated reasons for support of the amendment such as gun owners' rights being important to many Iowa residents and Iowa being one of very few states without a Second Amendment equivalent in its state constitution.

The legislation would limit government officials' power to restrict who can get a gun and where they can carry firearms.

Iowa Gun Owners, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to advance the Second Amendment, cited recent crimes such as the murder of a West Des Moines real estate agent, a Madison County elderly couple and two North Central Iowa gas station shopkeepers in its argument for the amendment presented to Paulsen in letter form.

"Iowa has experienced a recent number of horrific crimes ... no gun law restriction will prevent this from happening in the future," read the letter to Paulsen from several Republican legislators.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal, D-Council Bluffs, declined to shoot down the measure right away, instead electing to let the bill run through the committee process with mixed support.

Other bills include HF 2357, which would limit colleges and universities' authority to prohibit the possession of "dangerous weapons" in their buildings or on their grounds, whether being a public or private university. This is just one of several gun bills that work to allow guns in public areas where they are currently restricted.

The Brady Campaign reports that there have been 150 school shootings since 1997, including the shooting in Ohio's Chardon High School on Feb. 27 that claimed the lives of three students.

Two gun bills, including House Joint Resolution 2009, were up for debate in the House last Wednesday.

These debates took place after House Democrats chose to leave the state Capitol, stating that they were not informed that the bills would be debated on at that time.

After reviewing the bills in a caucus outside of the Capitol, House Democrats returned to the Capitol and proceeded with the debates.

The gun bills in question had been on the "blue calendar" since Tuesday, meaning they were eligible for debate at any time.
 

·
Now an Ex NYer
Joined
·
24,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
More...

http://iowastatedaily.com/news/article_0f03080a-6737-11e1-aa2d-001871e3ce6c.html

Gun laws bring big change to Iowa

Story
Comments

Posted: Monday, March 5, 2012 8:49 pm | Updated: 10:20 pm, Tue Mar 6, 2012.

By Katherine Klingseis, [email protected], Katelynn McCollough, [email protected], Briana Haguewood, [email protected] | 0 comments

Twenty-two bills pertaining to weapons and firearms have been introduced to the Iowa Legislature.

The bills introduce legislation involving everything from allowing citizens who feel threatened to defend themselves to a house joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Iowa Constitution ensuring Iowans the right to bear arms.

The Iowa "stand your ground" act will allow individuals who feel threatened to defend themselves, where the law previously requires them to flee the situation if possible. This act also will keep individuals who are not found criminally liable after defending themselves from facing civil lawsuits.

"'Stand your ground' states that if you are attacked at a place you have a right to be, you do not have to retreat ... you can stand your ground," said Dave Workman, director of communications at the Second Amendment Foundation. "It allows a person to fight back against an attack. You can resist."

Workman said stand your ground acts are often confused with the Castle doctrine. However, he explained that they are different than the Castle doctrine.

"Castle doctrine deals specifically with defending your home," Workman said. "'Stand your ground' extends that to beyond your doorstep."

House Joint Resolution 2009 proposes an amendment to the Iowa Constitution that states Iowans rights to keep and bear arms. The amendment to Article 1 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa would state citizens' "right to acquire, possess, transport, carry, transfer, and use arms."

House Joint Resolution 2009 passed in the House last Wednesday.

Workman said the right to keep and bear arms is important because it relates to the natural human right of self-preservation. He said that many gun prohibitionists don't understand guns and are simply afraid of them.

"They simply see firearms as tools of evil," Workman said. "Some people in the gun prohibitions movement are uneasy with the fact that people with firearms can actually exist."

The United States is unique in that it has a constitutional provision in the Bill of Rights that recognizes the right to keep and bear arms, Workman said. However, Iowa is one of six states that does not currently have an enumerated right to keep and bear arms stated in its constitution, according to the Iowa Firearms Coalition.

The Iowa constitutional amendment not only specifically declares the right of individuals to get and carry firearms, but also prohibits fees and limits restrictions related to gun use.

The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a nonprofit organization, gives 100-point scorecards to each state on the strength of their gun laws.

The Brady Campaign gave Iowa a scorecard of 7 points out of 100, stating that "Iowa has weak gun laws that help feed the illegal gun market and allow the sale of guns without background checks."

As a result of the proposition, those who choose to exercise their right to bear arms would not be required to submit mandatory licensing, registration or special taxation, and any other restriction would be "subject to scrutiny."

Thirty-six House Republicans are co-sponsoring the measure, including House Speaker Kraig Paulsen.

Paulsen has stated reasons for support of the amendment such as gun owners' rights being important to many Iowa residents and Iowa being one of very few states without a Second Amendment equivalent in its state constitution.

The legislation would limit government officials' power to restrict who can get a gun and where they can carry firearms.

Iowa Gun Owners, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to advance the Second Amendment, cited recent crimes such as the murder of a West Des Moines real estate agent, a Madison County elderly couple and two North Central Iowa gas station shopkeepers in its argument for the amendment presented to Paulsen in letter form.

"Iowa has experienced a recent number of horrific crimes ... no gun law restriction will prevent this from happening in the future," read the letter to Paulsen from several Republican legislators.

Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal, D-Council Bluffs, declined to shoot down the measure right away, instead electing to let the bill run through the committee process with mixed support.

Other bills include HF 2357, which would limit colleges and universities' authority to prohibit the possession of "dangerous weapons" in their buildings or on their grounds, whether being a public or private university. This is just one of several gun bills that work to allow guns in public areas where they are currently restricted.

The Brady Campaign reports that there have been 150 school shootings since 1997, including the shooting in Ohio's Chardon High School on Feb. 27 that claimed the lives of three students.

Two gun bills, including House Joint Resolution 2009, were up for debate in the House last Wednesday.

These debates took place after House Democrats chose to leave the state Capitol, stating that they were not informed that the bills would be debated on at that time.

After reviewing the bills in a caucus outside of the Capitol, House Democrats returned to the Capitol and proceeded with the debates.

The gun bills in question had been on the "blue calendar" since Tuesday, meaning they were eligible for debate at any time.
 

·
just working to improve,one round at a time
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
can anyone say ......WAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaa.

House Joint Resolution 2009 proposes an amendment to the Iowa Constitution that states Iowans rights to keep and bear arms. The amendment to Article 1 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa would state citizens' "right to acquire, possess, transport, carry, transfer, and use arms."

sounds right to me.
 

·
just working to improve,one round at a time
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
can anyone say ......WAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaa.

House Joint Resolution 2009 proposes an amendment to the Iowa Constitution that states Iowans rights to keep and bear arms. The amendment to Article 1 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa would state citizens' "right to acquire, possess, transport, carry, transfer, and use arms."

sounds right to me.
 

·
Now an Ex NYer
Joined
·
24,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
hydtguy said:
can anyone say ......WAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaa.

House Joint Resolution 2009 proposes an amendment to the Iowa Constitution that states Iowans rights to keep and bear arms. The amendment to Article 1 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa would state citizens' "right to acquire, possess, transport, carry, transfer, and use arms."

sounds right to me.
Iowa IS very close to Wisconsin....Maybe they took lessons...
 

·
Now an Ex NYer
Joined
·
24,861 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
hydtguy said:
can anyone say ......WAAAAAaaaaaaaaaaa.

House Joint Resolution 2009 proposes an amendment to the Iowa Constitution that states Iowans rights to keep and bear arms. The amendment to Article 1 of the Constitution of the State of Iowa would state citizens' "right to acquire, possess, transport, carry, transfer, and use arms."

sounds right to me.
Iowa IS very close to Wisconsin....Maybe they took lessons...
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top