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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/07/yolanda-quesada-wells-fargo_n_1496273.html?1336411923&icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk3%26pLid%3D158498

Yolanda Quesada Fired From Wells Fargo For Shoplifting 40 Years Ago

Imagine getting fired for a crime you committed not one, not two, not three, but four decades ago.

That's what happened to one Milwaukee woman. Wells Fargo fired Yolanda Quesada after a background check found that she shoplifted in 1972, a local NBC affiliate reports. Though Quesada acknowledges she committed the crime, she says shoplifting shortly after high school shouldn't be something that influences her job standing.

"[I'm] very good at what I do for Wells Fargo," Quesada told the television station.

Quesada, who is now 58, was fired shortly after receiving a report from an FBI background check in the mail, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports. A Wells Fargo spokesman told the Journal-Sentinel that the company began performing thorough background checks on all existing mortgage unit employees last year "due to legal requirements and changes in the regulatory environment."

"Because Wells Fargo is an insured depository institution, we are bound by federal law that generally prohibits us from hiring or continuing the employment of any person who we know has a criminal record involving dishonesty or breach of trust," Wells Fargo spokesman Jim Hines told the Journal-Sentinel.

Banks hiring workers may be particularly sensitive to taking on employees with a record of property crimes, according to a report from the National Institute of Justice. There is no empirical evidence indicating when it's safe to hire an ex-offender, according to the report. Still, most employers choose an arbitrary statute of limitations that is usually somewhere between five or 10 years.

Additionally, new guidelines from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission now make it easier for employers to hire workers with criminal records. The rules suggest that employers give applicants a chance to explain any crimes on their record before outright rejecting them.

Quesada is only one of many Wells Fargo workers to lose their jobs in recent months. The bank eliminated positions in its technology and operations unit in November in an aim to cut costs, according to Reuters.

Wells Fargo, the nation's largest bank by market cap, has itself been accused of improper actions recently. The bank currently faces at least two federal probes into how it treats minority borrowers and the properties it owns in minority neighborhoods.

Before that, it reached a $148 million settlement over separate charges that it systematically overcharged state and local governments.
 

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Sharp Shooter!
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I used to work for a IT consulting firm. Anyway,DeBeers asked one of the consultants on staff not to come back because of because of a police record about a car radio from 25 years ago...so this article about Wells Fargo doesn't shock me that much.
 

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That kinda sucks, but I can't say I feel bad. Plenty people are out of work right now that never had so much as a parking ticket.
 

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Putin, the new Ceasar. Veni,Vidi, Vici!
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That's why it doesn't pay to steal small: same punishment for a small "reward". You have to work for a bank and steal big!
 

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If you read paragraph 1 of the FDIC law in the link below the statement below is crap as the law states 10 years is the lifetime of the hiring ban or continued employment of such a person with that type of charge. However the company has in my opinion has every right to let her go if they feel unconfortable with someone who has demonstrated the capability to steal at all.

CRAP - "Because Wells Fargo is an insured depository institution, we are bound by federal law that generally prohibits us from hiring or continuing the employment of any person who we know has a criminal record involving dishonesty or breach of trust," Wells Fargo spokesman Jim Hines told the Journal-Sentinel.

http://www.fdic.gov/regulations/laws/rules/5000-1300.html
 

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Statute of Limitations  Yolanda is as safe as a bug in a rug. That cannot go on her record or be held against her in any way. However She can sue no matter how old it is  
 

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AngryAzn said:
I used to work for a IT consulting firm. Anyway,DeBeers asked one of the consultants on staff not to come back because of because of a police record about a car radio from 25 years ago...so this article about Wells Fargo doesn't shock me that much.
Wells Fargo in one of the biggest participants in the mortgage scandal's that have helped immensely to destroy our economy. I myself would have nothing to do with them nor Bank of America.
 

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When I worked on Wall Street there was this guy in my class. He was a real burner. Good at the job.

As we are filling out our background checks he mentions he had a forgery conviction while in college. He had photocopied some dollar bills and used them in the change machine to get on the train. Everybody was doing it but they caught him.

No license. He was automatically declined.

I bet this chick never mentioned the arrest. "Well, you wouldn't have given me the job if I told the truth."

This is why when I applied for my pistol license I told them everything, even what my proctologist said.
 

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..............   reminds me of this guy's job interview.
 

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AMF YOYO
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Wow, some pretty hardcore people here. You guys ever make a mistake? It's happened to me a couple of times in my nearly 50 years. And some of those mistakes put me into the hands of law enforcement officers. Does that make me an incorrigible career criminal who doesn't deserve to make amends and then move on with my life?

This woman made a mistake 40 YEARS ago when she was a teenager (58 minus 40 equals 18) and the bank is firing her now, just a few years short of retirement. Seems like an overly convenient way to get rid of a high-salary employee AND a retirement/pension obligation at the same time.
 

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SFC Mac said:
Statute of Limitations Yolanda is as safe as a bug in a rug. That cannot go on her record or be held against her in any way. However She can sue no matter how old it is
Nice try there. Statute of limitations is related to criminal charges. Further, Wisconsin is a "at will" state. Employers can terminate someone for any reason, or no reason at all. As long as it is not for a discriminatory motivation or because they're in the military reserves.
 

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spider said:
When I worked on Wall Street there was this guy in my class. He was a real burner. Good at the job.

As we are filling out our background checks he mentions he had a forgery conviction while in college. He had photocopied some dollar bills and used them in the change machine to get on the train. Everybody was doing it but they caught him.

No license. He was automatically declined.

I bet this chick never mentioned the arrest. "Well, you wouldn't have given me the job if I told the truth."

This is why when I applied for my pistol license I told them everything, even what my proctologist said.
When worked on Wall Street, a vendor applied to be an employee. He was connected high up, and the hiring mgr's mgr was getting a referral fee for bringing him in. As it turned out, a few years before, he had stabbed an employee at this firm. He disclosed it and got the job. While I was there, he got into a dispute and threw a direct report down the stairs. He kept the job, direct report was let go. Gotta love good connections. All white collar middle management.
 

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Myrcinus said:
Wow, some pretty hardcore people here. You guys ever make a mistake? It's happened to me a couple of times in my nearly 50 years. And some of those mistakes put me into the hands of law enforcement officers. Does that make me an incorrigible career criminal who doesn't deserve to make amends and then move on with my life?

This woman made a mistake 40 YEARS ago when she was a teenager (58 minus 40 equals 18) and the bank is firing her now, just a few years short of retirement. Seems like an overly convenient way to get rid of a high-salary employee AND a retirement/pension obligation at the same time.
Agreed. Seeing as how she is not currently incarcerated, I have a feeling she did her time (or more likely paid her fine) and her debt to society has been paid. 40 years is a long time. I think that should count for something, and I hope she sues, and wins. (Not normally a fan of suing either)
 

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###^^^^&54**()*&^%&&())))_(*% Corporate World  Almost wants to make you vote for OBama    Tax the sh*t out of them Put em all in the Poor house     ;D
 

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SFC Mac said:
###^^^^&54**()*&^%&&())))_(*% Corporate World Almost wants to make you vote for OBama ;D
Why? With his bailouts it's obvious that he supports the corporations too.
 

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sherm66 said:
Nice try there. Statute of limitations is related to criminal charges. Further, Wisconsin is a "at will" state. Employers can terminate someone for any reason, or no reason at all. As long as it is not for a discriminatory motivation or because they're in the military reserves.
At Will Employment needs to be abolished. Too many employers abuse the concept. If your going to terminate an employee you should have a valid reason for doing so .... and a misdemeanor from 40 years ago is not valid. There also needs to be a recourse for terminated employees.
 

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Relax Starship Just making a joke, but I'm glad to see you guys are answering some of my posts I was beginning to think everyone here was mad at me.     :)
 
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