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I'm looking at my fireplace, and there is a capped off propane line running right to the back of the fireplace. It's a live propane line. 3/4" black pipe. No gas rooster anywhere near the fireplace, and none in the basement.

I know they make log lighters, gas logs, etc, etc; but this is a wood burning fireplace that was used extensively.

I would suspect this gas line gets pretty hot during a wood fire, therefore the propane would expand. I'm really not comfortable with a gas line in the firebox. I'm surprised it didn't explode.....

How exactly do they build these with gas lines right inside the firebox ?? and what clearances are necessary ?
 

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If this is used for wood fires , then a gas line should not be there. I guess that a previous owner got sick of the wood ash mess and decided to put a gas log set up in the fire box. If this is truly live with gas you should call a plumber to take a look at it unless you feel you are competent enough to deal with capping it off at the source.
 

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I'm looking at my fireplace, and there is a capped off propane line running right to the back of the fireplace. It's a live propane line. 3/4" black pipe. No gas rooster anywhere near the fireplace, and none in the basement.

I know they make log lighters, gas logs, etc, etc; but this is a wood burning fireplace that was used extensively.

I would suspect this gas line gets pretty hot during a wood fire, therefore the propane would expand. I'm really not comfortable with a gas line in the firebox. I'm surprised it didn't explode.....

How exactly do they build these with gas lines right inside the firebox ?? and what clearances are necessary ?
A lot of older installations have a valve under the floor shutting off the gas far from the heat of a fireplace
 

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As counterintuitive as this sounds, you could take a propane torch to that pipe and you couldn't kaboom it. This is due to the fact that propane contains no oxygen and can't support combustion until it is in a near-stoichiometric mix ratio with oxygen. With atmospheric air which is roughly 20 percent oxygen that works out to a combustion range of about 2%-10% propane.

As far as expansion, again, it's a gas and will expand its volume relative to temperature per Boyle's law but a "live" stub is only a fractional percentage of the volume in the piupe and the supply pressure is only a few inches of water column, so do the math and again you are nowhere near rupturing a pipe.

I get that you'd worry if you dids not take any of this into consideration, but removing the stub is just a "feel good measure" that will make a gas conversion harder in the future.
And I know that sounds counterintuitive- but its true.
 

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A lot of older installations have a valve under the floor shutting off the gas far from the heat of a fireplace
That's a service valve which is necessary to remove or service the unit without shutting off the building's gas supply and is a code requirement, but it has nothing to do with "heat". I believe current code calls for the service valve to be within 6'(UPC) or 4'(IRC) outside the hearth or INSIDE the firbox if approved by manufacturer- that's from my CodeCheck table I keep next to my desk here.
 

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I couldn't remove the stub out if I wanted too. It's buried in cement, in a pipe sleeve. I could certainly break the union in the basement, & cap it off from there. Or at least put a gas valve in the basement under the fireplace.

Considering Caption Will's theory, who can I call to check it out ??
 
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