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AMF YOYO
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While cleaning out the basement after my FIL passed away, I noticed what I thought was efflorescence on the basement walls. After the clean-out was done, I painted with UGL Latex Waterproofing paint. A few years later now, I notice that the paint is bubbled and is peeling away from the walls in some spots.

My understanding was that efflorescence was a problem with newer concrete and this house is more than 50 years old.

Is there something else happening? Water intrusion? I never see damp spots on the floor or anything, but we do keep a dehumidifier running 24/7/365.
 

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Monitoring the exterior grading during rainfall for possible ponding near the perimeter of the foundation is recommended. Sloping the exterior grading so that rain water can channel at least 4-6 feet away from the foundation is also recommended to prevent moisture related damage and an environment for insect activity. The interior foundation contains signs of moisture due to hydrostatic pressure that could be controlled with a properly designed drainage system. Surface grading and control of roof runoff so that water flows away from the foundation is recommended to prevent water intrusion and moisture related damage. Efflorescence is normally the result of the exterior conditions.
 

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Efflorescence is a normal occurrence with concrete. It happens because some of the water soluable salts come out of the concrete. This can happen because of excess moisture used when working the concrete or from moisture seeping through the concrete. Concrete is basically like a sponge for water. I believe that you should have used muriatic acid to clean the efflorescence before you tried to dry-loc it. Dryloc is good stuff, but proper preparation is key.
 

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Throw a moisture meter on the walls and get an idea of the water present. The paint can help to encapsulate moisture and result in blistering, mold or mildew. Cracks and spalls are important to look for but be aware of what's going on on the exterior opposite the walls you are seeing the problem on.
 
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