Long Island Shooters Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to make the plunge in buying a Compass Lake Engineering (CLE) chambered barrel for a AR-15 accuracy build. The problem is that I can't decide between the CLE match or the Wylde chamber. I see that CLE claims that their own CLE match chamber produces about 23% smaller groups than the Wylde chamber....I am wondering if anyone has been able to document that amount (or any amount) smaller groups when compared to the Wylde chamber in the real world. I was initially going to go with the Wylde chamber but after looking over CLE's website, I started thinking that I might should go with the CLE match. I am just nervous in choosing the CLE match because I have heard that certain brands of factory ammo may not chamber properly with it where as with the Wylde, I have never heard of any problems. I guess what I am ultimately trying to decide is how much difference is there truly between the accuracy potential of the CLE match and Wylde chambers. I am also trying to decide if the CLE match is worth it if there is a chance that some factory ammunition brands may not chamber properly with it. In case you are wondering, I haven't started reloading yet, so this is the reason for the concern with the factory ammunition. Besides, even after I start reloading, I don't know if I really want to go with a chamber that may be picky with what it will chamber...factory or reloads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,728 Posts
Do keep in mind with those specialty chambers you may have problems running "economy" ammunition. We have seen problems with 55gr ammo in .223 Wylde chambers because the lead it too long relative to the bullet. If you are going to hand load 75-77+ go for it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rlitman

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
There are step-by-step to use a compass that can useful for someone. Open the compass: Let the cover and the base form a 90-degree angle. Move the lens holder: Slightly push forward the lens holder. Hand placement: Insert your thumb through the thumb loop and the index finger along the compass. Place the three remaining fingers below as if you are holding a gun. On the other hand, wrap the fingers around the three fingers below the compass. Sight: Now peek through the rear sight slot, aligning the sighting wire or the front sight to the desired direction or object. Your cheek should be resting on the base of your thumb. Read the azimuth: Lastly, ensuring the dial is floating, look down on it and read the azimuth.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top