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A Vietnam War Sniper Crawled for 3 Days Across 2000m of Open Field, Killed NVA General With One Shot, Then Crawled Back

https://www.warhisto...awled-back.html



"She was a bad woman," Carlos Hathcock once said of the woman known as 'Apache.' "Normally kill squads would just kill a Marine and take his shoes or whatever, but the Apache was very sadistic. She would do anything to cause pain." This was the trademark of the female Viet Cong platoon leader. She captured Americans in the area around Carlos Hathcock's unit and then tortured them without mercy.

"I was in her backyard, she was in mine. I didn't like that," Hathcock said. "It was personal, very personal. She'd been torturing Marines before I got there."

In November of 1966, she captured a Marine Private and tortured him within earshot of his own unit.

"She tortured him all afternoon, half the next day," Hathcock recalls. "I was by the wire… He walked out, died right by the wire. "Apache skinned the private, cut off his eyelids, removed his fingernails, and then castrated him before letting him go. Hathcock attempted to save him, but he was too late.

Carlos Hathcock had enough. He set out to kill Apache before she could kill any more Marines. One day, he and his spotter got a chance. The observed an NVA sniper platoon on the move. At 700 yards in, one of them stepped off the trail and Hathcock took what he calls the best shot he ever made.

"We were in the midst of switching rifles. We saw them," he remembered. "I saw a group coming, five of them. I saw her squat to pee, that's how I knew it was her. They tried to get her to stop, but she didn't stop. I stopped her. I put one extra in her for good measure."

Carlos Norman Hathcock II was a United States Marine Corps sniper with a service record of 93 confirmed kills. Hathcock's record and the extraordinary details of the missions he undertook made him a legend in the Marine Corps. His fame as a sniper and his dedication to long-distance shooting led him to become a major developer of the United States Marine Corps Sniper training program. He was honored by having a rifle named after him: a variant of the M21 dubbed the Springfield Armory M25 White Feather, for the nickname "White Feather" given to Hathcock by the NVA.



Hathcock was born in Little Rock, Arkansas on May 20, 1942. He grew up in rural Arkansas, living with his grandmother after his parents separated. While visiting relatives in Mississippi, he took to shooting and hunting at an early age, partly out of necessity to help feed his poor family. He would go into the woods with his dog and pretend to be a soldier and hunt imaginary Japanese with the old Mauser his father brought back from World War I. He hunted at that early age with a .22-caliber J. C. Higgins single-shot rifle. Hathcock dreamed of being a Marine throughout his childhood, and so on May 20, 1959, at the age of 17, he enlisted in the Marine Corps.Hathcock married Jo Winstead on the date of the Marine Corps birthday, on November 10, 1962. Jo gave birth to a son, whom they named Carlos Norman Hathcock III.

Before deploying to Vietnam, Hathcock had won shooting championships, including matches at Camp Perry and the Wimbledon Cup. In 1966 Hathcock started his deployment in Vietnam as a military policeman and later became a sniper after Captain Edward James Land pushed the Marines into raising snipers in every platoon. Land later recruited Marines who had set their own records in sharpshooting; he quickly found Hathcock, who had won the Wimbledon Cup, the most prestigious prize for long-range shooting, at Camp Perry in 1965.



During the Vietnam War, Hathcock had 93 confirmed kills of North Vietnamese Army (NVA) and Viet-Cong personnel. In the Vietnam War, kills had to be confirmed by an acting third party, who had to be an officer, besides the sniper's spotter. Snipers often did not have an acting third party present, making confirmation difficult, especially if the target was behind enemy lines, as was usually the case.
Hathcock himself estimated that he had killed between 300 and 400 enemy personnel during his time in Vietnam.

Confrontations with North Vietnamese snipers

The North Vietnamese Army placed a bounty of $30,000 on Hathcock's life for killing so many of their men. Rewards put on US snipers by the NVA typically ranged from $8 to $2,000. Hathcock held the record for highest bounty and killed every Vietnamese marksman who sought it. The Viet Cong and NVA called Hathcock Du kích Lông Trắng, translated as "White Feather Sniper", because of the white feather he kept in a band on his bush hat. After a platoon of Vietnamese snipers was sent to hunt down "White Feather", many Marines in the same area donned white feathers to deceive the enemy. These Marines were aware of the impact Hathcock's death would have and took it upon themselves to make themselves targets in order to confuse the counter-snipers.

One of Hathcock's most famous accomplishments was shooting an enemy sniper through the enemy's own rifle scope, hitting him in the eye and killing him. Hathcock and John Roland Burke, his spotter, were stalking the enemy sniper in the jungle near Hill 55, the firebase from which Hathcock was operating. The sniper, known only as the 'Cobra,' had already killed several Marines and was believed to have been sent specifically to kill Hathcock. When Hathcock saw a flash of light (light reflecting off the enemy sniper's scope) in the bushes, he fired at it, shooting through the scope and killing the sniper. Surveying the situation, Hathcock concluded that the only feasible way he could have put the bullet straight down the enemy's scope and through his eye would have been if both snipers were zeroing in on each other at the same time and Hathcock fired first, which gave him only a few seconds to act. Given the flight time of rounds at long ranges, the snipers could have simultaneously killed one another. Hathcock took possession of the dead sniper's rifle, hoping to bring it home as a "trophy" but, after he turned it in and tagged it, it was stolen from the armory.

Hathcock only once removed the white feather from his bush hat while deployed in Vietnam. During a volunteer mission days before the end of his first deployment, he crawled over 1,500 yards of field to shoot a high-ranking NVA officer. He was not informed of the details of the mission until he accepted it. This effort took four days and three nights, without sleep, of constant inch-by-inch crawling. Hathcock said he was almost stepped on as he lay camouflaged with grass and vegetation in a meadow shortly after sunset. At one point he was nearly bitten by a bamboo viper but had the presence of mind to avoid moving and giving up his position. As the officer exited his encampment, Hathcock fired a single shot that struck the officer in the chest, killing him.

After the arduous mission of killing the NVA officer, Hathcock returned to the United States in 1967.However, he missed the Marine Corps and returned to Vietnam in 1969, where he took command of a platoon of snipers.

Hathcock's career as a sniper came to a sudden end along Route 1, north of LZ Baldy in September 1969, when the amtrack he was riding on, an LVT-5, struck an anti-tank mine. Hathcock pulled seven Marines off the flame-engulfed vehicle and was severely burned before jumping to safety. While recovering, Hathcock received the Purple Heart. Nearly 30 years later, he would receive the Silver Star for this action. All eight injured Marines were evacuated by helicopter to the hospital ship USS Repose (AH-16), then to a Naval Hospitalin Tokyo, and ultimately to the burn center at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas.

Hathcock generally used the standard sniper rifle: the Winchester Model 70 .30-06 caliber rifle with the standard 8-power Unertl scope. On some occasions, however, he used a different weapon: the M2 Browning machine gun, on which he mounted a 10X Unertl scope, using a bracket of his own design. Hathcock made a number of kills with this weapon in excess of 1,000 yards, including his record for the longest confirmed kill at 2,500 yards. Hathcock carried a Colt M1911A1 pistol as a sidearm.

After the Vietnam War

After returning to active duty, Hathcock helped establish the Marine Corps Scout Sniper School, at the Marine base in Quantico, Virginia. Due to his extreme injuries suffered in Vietnam, he was in nearly constant pain, but he continued to dedicate himself to teaching snipers. In 1975, Hathcock's health began to deteriorate, and he was diagnosed withmultiple sclerosis. He stayed in the Marine Corps, but his health continued to decline, and was forced to retire just 55 days short of the 20 years that would have made him eligible for full retirement pay. Being medically retired, he received 100 percent disability. He would have received only 50 percent of his final pay grade had he retired after 20 years. He fell into a state of depression when he was forced out of the Marines, because he felt as if the service had kicked him out. During this depression, his wife Jo nearly left him, but decided to stay. Hathcock eventually picked up the hobby of shark fishing, which helped him overcome his depression.

Hathcock provided sniper instruction to police departments and select military units, such as SEAL Team Six.

Later life and death

Hathcock once said that he survived in his work because of an ability to "get in the bubble", to put himself into a state of "utter, complete, absolute concentration", first with his equipment, then his environment, in which every breeze and every leaf meant something, and finally on his quarry. After the war, a friend showed Hathcock a passage written by Ernest Hemingway: "Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and like it, never really care for anything else thereafter." He copied Hemingway's words on a piece of paper. "He got that right," Hathcock said. "It was the hunt, not the killing." Hathcock said in a book written about his career as a sniper: "I like shooting, and I love hunting. But I never did enjoy killing anybody. It's my job. If I don't get those bastards, then they're gonna kill a lot of these kids dressed up like Marines. That's the way I look at it."

Hathcock's son, Carlos Hathcock III, later enlisted in the Marine Corps; he retired from the Marine Corps as a Gunnery Sergeant after following in his father's footsteps as a shooter and became a member of the Board of Governors of the Marine Corps Distinguished Shooters Association.

Carlos Hathcock died on February 22, 1999, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, from complications resulting from multiple sclerosis.
 

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I've posted this before, but I was fortunate enough to meet the Gunny (and CWO Henderson, who wrote the book). We invited him shark fishing (I wound up not being able to go) and we met at the Massapequa Marine Corps League. A few members of my USMC scout/sniper platoon were present and he happily signed his book and other things and drank ginger ale all night. I had a 110 camera back then and the pics didn't come out too great - gotta' find them anyway.

One of our country's finest, ever.
 

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Btw...regards the woman NVA sniper. Hatchcock said she was the only person he took the time to put TWO ROUNDS INTO. After seeing the Marine skinned alive, Hathcock wanted her real dead.

He also tells of keeping an NVA battalion pinned down for a day or two. Caught in a valley he picked off any fool who raised their head. They were so scared of him they refused orders to move.

Maj. John Plaster (SOG) has a video interview with him. And Maj Land just retired as the Secretary of the NRA.

http://www.amazon.com/Marine-Sniper-Carlos-Hathcock-Snipercraft/dp/B00008W70A/ref=sr_1_2?
 
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Let's not forget:

Chuck Mawhinney

Chuck Mawhinney was a US Marine Corps sniper who served sixteen months in the Vietnam War. Although he was less well known than his more famous counterpart sniper legend Carlos Hathcock, Mawhinney actually had 103 confirmed kills to Hathcock's 93. Mawhinney had another 216 that are listed as "probables" by the U.S. Marine Corps.

Charles Benjamin "Chuck" Mawhinney was born in Oregon in 1949. He was the son of a World War II Marine Corps veteran. When he was young, he would spend a lot of time in the woods hunting alone. At the age of 18, Mawhinney joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1967. When he left the Marine Corps in 1970, he slipped into obscurity, and went without notice for his number of confirmed kills for more than two decades. He returned home to Oregon, married, and began to work for the U.S. Forest Service, where he worked until his retired in the late 1990s.

Collected and laid back, Chuck Mawhinney had never spoken of his exploits back in Vietnam ever since he had left the Marine Corps in 1970. Nevertheless, a book titled Dear Mom: A Sniper's Vietnam, which was written by fellow Marine sniper and author Joseph T. Ward, exposed him as a self-possessed, extremely skillful sniper. But the book recognized him as having 101 confirmed kills and many disputed the claim, believing that Carlos Hathcock had more confirmed kills than any other American sniper. However, after carefully research had been done, it was revealed that US Army sniper Adelbert Waldron actually had 109 confirmed kills, and Mawhinney actually had 103 confirmed kills and 216 probable kills, while a third Marine Corps sniper, Eric R. England, had 98 confirmed kills. This led to Mawhinney replacing Carlos Hathcock as the USMC sniper with the greatest amount of confirmed kills on record, and ranking number two overall behind Waldron.

MORE:
http://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2012/9/17/a-marines-rifle/
 

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Can't say enough how much I admire these men. The obvious skills in their craft aside, they had (and still do) incredibly difficult jobs.
To have a man in your sights, once, might be more than most could manage to deal with, they do it with regularity. To take that shot once or hundreds of times is both an honor and a curse for many snipers.
No one can say for sure how many good guy lives our snipers save by taking out the trash.

HOOAH Marines ! (Dept of the Navy
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Let's not forget:

Chuck Mawhinney

Chuck Mawhinney was a US Marine Corps sniper who served sixteen months in the Vietnam War. Although he was less well known than his more famous counterpart sniper legend Carlos Hathcock, Mawhinney actually had 103 confirmed kills to Hathcock's 93. Mawhinney had another 216 that are listed as "probables" by the U.S. Marine Corps.

Charles Benjamin "Chuck" Mawhinney was born in Oregon in 1949. He was the son of a World War II Marine Corps veteran. When he was young, he would spend a lot of time in the woods hunting alone. At the age of 18, Mawhinney joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1967. When he left the Marine Corps in 1970, he slipped into obscurity, and went without notice for his number of confirmed kills for more than two decades. He returned home to Oregon, married, and began to work for the U.S. Forest Service, where he worked until his retired in the late 1990s.

Collected and laid back, Chuck Mawhinney had never spoken of his exploits back in Vietnam ever since he had left the Marine Corps in 1970. Nevertheless, a book titled Dear Mom: A Sniper's Vietnam, which was written by fellow Marine sniper and author Joseph T. Ward, exposed him as a self-possessed, extremely skillful sniper. But the book recognized him as having 101 confirmed kills and many disputed the claim, believing that Carlos Hathcock had more confirmed kills than any other American sniper. However, after carefully research had been done, it was revealed that US Army sniper Adelbert Waldron actually had 109 confirmed kills, and Mawhinney actually had 103 confirmed kills and 216 probable kills, while a third Marine Corps sniper, Eric R. England, had 98 confirmed kills. This led to Mawhinney replacing Carlos Hathcock as the USMC sniper with the greatest amount of confirmed kills on record, and ranking number two overall behind Waldron.

MORE:
http://www.americanr...-marines-rifle/
but you forget.
Guuny Hathcock was SNCOIC of the snipers. He had to fight the bureaucracy, the Officers that hated snipers because they were a autonomous unit, and build the Marine Corps sniper program as well as run a unit.
Waldron had a detail to assist him and even a assigned helicopter if I remember correctly
Hathcock usually walked or hitched a ride, alone or with a spotter.
He took the hardest jobs because he was a leader.
The man was absolutly amazing.
The white feather also had the highest bounty on his head by the NVA.
Typically bounties offered for killing snipers were as little as $8 up to $2000.
A great deal of money to these people at the time. The bounty on Hathcock was $30,000. The highest bounty ever offered.
They hated him and wanted him badly.
Everyone that tried to get it ended up dirtknapping, courtesy of the white feather.
 

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but you forget.
Guuny Hathcock was SNCOIC of the snipers. He had to fight the bureaucracy, the Officers that hated snipers because they were a autonomous unit, and build the Marine Corps sniper program as well as run a unit.
Waldron had a detail to assist him and even a assigned helicopter if I remember correctly
Hathcock usually walked or hitched a ride, alone or with a spotter.
He took the hardest jobs because he was a leader.
The man was absolutly amazing.
The white feather also had the highest bounty on his head by the NVA.
Typically bounties offered for killing snipers were as little as $8 up to $2000.
A great deal of money to these people at the time. The bounty on Hathcock was $30,000. The highest bounty ever offered.
They hated him and wanted him badly.
Everyone that tried to get it ended up dirtknapping, courtesy of the white feather.
LOL, I don't forget any of that. Carlos had Jim Land ('nough said! He is our father).

In another thread I posted about comparing Snipers was like comparing running backs. 100's of variables. They're all amazing...all HEROS.
 
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