Long Island Shooters Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quite interesting. I wonder if any of the folks in the gunworld have done studies they could compare with this, as far as reaction speed and accuracy. With things like simunitions and projection screens it could be interesting.

http://www.boingboing.net/2010/02/05/science-of-gun-duels.html

<http://www.boingboing.net/2010/02/05/science-of-gun-duels.html>

Science of gun duels
By David Pescovitz at 6:01 AM February 5, 2010

In the gun duels of Hollywood Westerns, the one who draws first (usually the bad guy) always tends to lose. Why? Decades ago, Nobel laureate Niels Bohr claimed that would likely be the case in a real duel too because the cowboy who draws second would have a reactive advantage -- the person reacting "without thinking" moves quicker than the person who consciously draws first. Indeed, new research on the matter by University of Birmingham psychologist Andrew Welchman suggests that the brain's wiring evolved such that reactive movements are faster than voluntary ones. However, Welchman says that this doesn't mean the Hollywood cliche is based in reality. In experiments he ran where players competed by hitting a series of buttons rather than firing on one another, the reaction time -- the delay between a stimulus and execution of a response -- negated the reactive advantage. From New Scientist:

There was a "reaction time"... delay of 200 milliseconds before the players started to respond to their opponent's actions. So although they moved faster, they never won.
The only way the last guy to draw could win is if the reactive part of the brain makes him move so fast that the time it takes him to draw, plus his reaction time, is less than the time it takes the first guy just to draw.

"It would be hard to get fast enough to recover the time it takes to react to your opponent," says Welchman. He thinks fast reactions evolved for avoiding unexpected danger, or for confrontations in which animals are in a face-off, and the second to move needs speed.

Indeed, Welchman's "reactive" players hit the buttons less accurately than the "intentional" players, another reason fast reactions may not win gunfights.
 
G

·
DavidE said:
Quite interesting. I wonder if any of the folks in the gunworld have done studies they could compare with this, as far as reaction speed and accuracy. With things like simunitions and projection screens it could be interesting.
I'm not sure what you mean by "the gunworld" but you should take a look at the videos posted by Force Science Institute. FSI appears to be an alternate name for Force Science Research Center. FSRC, in turn, is a project of the psychology department at Minnesota State University, Mankato, dedicated to studying the psychological issues that enhance and impede performance in law enforcement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I thought the reason that the guy who drwas first loses is because bad guys always drew first and good guys always win. See you don't need all that silly science after all.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top