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Looking to get a rough idea of the minimum gear needed for a first timer hunting deer (rifle) upstate - Hunter Mtn Area. By minimum, I'm looking for not the best equipment/priciest equipment, just stuff that will keep me warm and stuff I can put together on a relatively small budget. Would like to make sure I will like it first before dropping too much money into it.

What are the recommendations and checklist for boots, clothing, scent blocker stuff, etc. (Have the rifle and all that stuff) -

Any suggestions in terms of what will be needed, what brands are recommended for a rookie, etc?
 

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try cabelas or gander mountain they have a nice selection and helpful staff on hand to help you. I went to cabelas last year to get hunting gear it was my first time hunting and he people at cabelas help me a lot selecting gear. I picked up insulated coveralls on sale and the gore-tex boots were on sale also water proof and warm. Good luck
 

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There isn't really a definitive checklist per se... what I like or swear by someone else will call garbage.

If you are just getting into hunting, plan out your outfit to incorporate layers so you can dress up / down dependent on the season and the weather. I would suggest that your outer layers be windproof, breathable and quiet. No cotton - your goal is to stay warm and dry.

Warm waterproof boots are a necessity - as are wool or wool blend socks.

I always carry a first aid kit with an Israeli trauma bandage for the worst case. Also a basic survival kit with an MRE, duct tape, rope and a plastic tarp.

And don't buy into any of the marketing hype.
 

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Many new hunters going upstate for the first time get cold quick walking up a mountain trail. Best to carry extra warm dry clothes and blanket to stay warm. Muck boots are good for crossing creeks and muddy terrain. I stay away from leather boots. Wool commando sweaters work well . Gloves and a warm knit head cover. Make sure the gear is quiet and waterproof.
 

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Good boots and socks are non-negotiable, not necessarily expensive, but good. I bought a pair from Cabela's for $140 and my feet have never been happier.

Everything else is personal preference. I started hunting with all my dad's old stuff. Really old stuff. Many layers of ordinary clothing under the hunting jacket and pants saved the day.

I hunt an hour or so northwest of Hunter. There is no perfect setup. Opening day at 5am on some years is 45 degrees Fahrenheit. On other years it's 12 degrees. You're not going out dressed the same under those two circumstances.

My advice, because I'm cheap as hell when it comes to limited use stuff like this, is shop the clearance racks or online deals. And be prepared to experience a few years being under dressed and a few years overdressed. It's virtually impossible to get it perfect on year one so try to hunt close to camp until you get it figured out. A 20 minute or half hour walk out is fine even if you can't feel your toes. That may not work out so well if you're 4 miles into the woods.
 

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Gore tex and other similar breathable fabrics are a must for the outer layer. They will keep your dry in rain but not make you overly sweaty.

Get a good polartec hat. Your most important piece of warmth gear.

And it goes without saying - orange, orange, orange. And more orange.
 

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One simple thing to do to keep warm feet.
Wear a set of regular socks as you walk to your stand.
when you settle in, remove your boots and socks and then put on some nice warm dry wool socks.
I suggest a pack to keep some TP, paper towels, drink, candy & snack , rope,cheap rain poncho, surgical gloves for skinning to keep hands clean, etc.
When I walk in I put my warm coat in the pack too. Sweat will make you cold later on.
When I get a deer the coat goes in the pack because of the energy used dragging the deer out
 

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A spare pair of socks is a must, as well as some 1 gallon ziploc bags. If your boots get wet you can change into dry socks and put your footsies into the bags and then into the boots. The boots may be wet but your feet won't be.
 

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I am guessing you all ready have the basics
so this is just a few thing you might want to bring hunting

this is some of the things i tell my class to bring just in case they need to do a sleep over in the woods

binocular [monocular]
first aid kit
space blanket
rope
plastic 8x8 [tarp]
small mirror
plastic whistle
orange hat and vest to cover vitals
extra gloves and sockets place in zip lock bag keep dry
sharpening stone
flash light extra batters
glow sticks
sowing kit
bottle water
bic lighter
fishing line and two small jig head
 
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Looking to get a rough idea of the minimum gear needed for a first timer hunting deer (rifle) upstate - Hunter Mtn Area. By minimum, I'm looking for not the best equipment/priciest equipment, just stuff that will keep me warm and stuff I can put together on a relatively small budget. Would like to make sure I will like it first before dropping too much money into it.

What are the recommendations and checklist for boots, clothing, scent blocker stuff, etc. (Have the rifle and all that stuff) -

Any suggestions in terms of what will be needed, what brands are recommended for a rookie, etc?
Like others have mentioned- a good pair of boots are worth every penny when you're sitting in the cold woods for hours. Nothing spoils a hunt like frozen feet.
For clothes- think of layering when you get dress for hunting. Base layer (Polypro-thermals (I don't recommend cotton thermals-holds moisture)) , mid layer (shirt, hoodie, vest, etc) & outter layer (coat).
I keep my coat in my backpack until I reach my stand/spot.
I keep an extra pair of gloves, hat, socks, undergarment in my backpack in case of emergency.
Use a softshell or cotton backpack (nylon makes too much noise.)
Buy some "Hot Hands" (they make them for feet & body too.)
Keep a poncho in your pack in case of rain.

Hunting is not cheap, but once you get your gear established, It should last you for years or a lifetime.

Funny thing is, I always see the local hunters wearing a pair of jeans & a camo or red plaid jacket. (But they probably on live 15min away.)
 

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Last year I wore carhartt overalls and one of their parkas with a carhartt sweatshirt with several underlayers while sitting in a tree stand for a few hours. Kept me warm, decently priced, not made in China, the stuff lasts for a long time. We had to pry a 30 year old carhartt coat loose from my dad's hands, he wouldn't give it up.

For a bag I'd look into the 5.11 tactical Rush 12 or Rush 24 systems. Decent price at around $100. Plenty of space for gear, food, etc.
 

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That reminds me - baby wipes. You can thank me later.
Never use white. Looks like a white tail. I recommend Dunkin doughnuts brown napkins. They blend in perfectly.
 

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I wear the old time polypropylene underwear , and wool outerwear, with at least one wool sweater, two when it is cold. Sometimes double long johns when it is cold. Layers give you options. Wool socks inside of Muck boots, with toe warmers handy for the cold. A neck gaiter to block the drafts. Wool knit hat. Blaze orange vest. Wool is very quiet when still hunting, decent in a mist. I walk really slow to my stand so I don't get sweated up, or spook game. If I have to drag a deer, I do it in my long johns. Looks funny, but keeps me from overheating. I bundle all my clothing when dragging a deer,put it at a spot 50 yds. away, drag to the bundle, and repeat until done. I carry Poland Spring bottle water, and cliff bars for energy. A foam pad Hunters seat. Keeps your butt warm and dry. A whistle to signal if I need help. Some marking tape if I need it to mark a down deer, or recreate a shot to assist in trailing.a compression bandage is a good idea, as you just might nick yourself when gutting a deer. Of course a good knife, not too large. I like fixed blade with less than 4 inch blade. Drop point or clip blade. Lately I use the so called CANADIAN blade from cold steel, works real well, is cheap in case you lose it,and takes a real good edge. If I was way out by myself, I would bring some fire starting stuff, rain gear , compass, and a waterproof map, and know how to use them. Always have a flashlight. Aside from gun and ammo, that's it for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Never use white. Looks like a white tail. I recommend Dunkin doughnuts brown napkins. They blend in perfectly.
Have you done time in the pen? Those seem like they would be a lil harsh on the ol balloon knot. But good point about using white.....

For other hunters out there in the woods, CONFIRM with 110% certainty what you're looking at is a deer and confirm where your round could go whether your hit or miss the deer. You don't want your round coming down where you can't see....know your target and BEYOND!!!!
 
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