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good starting reloading press


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31 replies to this topic

#1 jm7480

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Posted February 14 2019 - 08:19 PM

Im looking into reloading  38 and 45 and looking for suggestions for a starting press . I would like to buy something that i will be able to build upon and not just replace after a few years.



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#2 rvc-ny

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Posted February 15 2019 - 02:30 AM

RCBS Rockchucker has served me well for 30 years.  Get carbide dies, but I have done without all the progressive loader stuff except for a primer feeder.  I like it because it's simple and I think safer because I can see what I'm doing at each step.  Yes it might be slower but I can reload hundreds of rounds in a few hours and that's enough for my range shooting.


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#3 tom2009

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Posted February 15 2019 - 04:48 AM

I sent you a message



#4 Tom Mac

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Posted February 15 2019 - 08:27 AM

I lean to the Lee Classic Turret ( LCT ) as a  first press....

 

You can run it as a single stage to start off slow, can change calipers in a matter of secs ( with second turret disk  ), and a full kit with dies is under $300 ( minus a few extras needed )

When running can easily do 150 per hour  ( as single stage can load rifle over 3" long or so )

 

Been running one for many years now along with other presses.


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#5 JoeS

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Posted February 15 2019 - 11:57 AM

I suggest a Dillon 550. You can keep it basic or add on as you advance. Your first investment is the cheapest and the hold value if you decide to sell.



#6 thetalonguy

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Posted February 15 2019 - 07:27 PM

Wheres the best place to find these on the used market?

Guessing Brownells for new?

#7 mason852

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Posted February 16 2019 - 05:12 PM

I love the Rockchucker my bench setup is a case trimmer on the left 2 Rockchuckers in the middle and the powder measure on the right

I am reloading for quality not quantity and am anal about powder weight and my setup lets me craft every round

My setup is not a progressive but neither am I LOL



#8 Wowzer

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Posted February 16 2019 - 05:23 PM

I just started reloading about a year ago. I have a lee progressive 1000. It's low cost, but does the job. I have loaded thousands of 38 and 45. While the press is a 3 stage (instead of 4), it will get the job done. I got mine used for $150 (and the original owner had both 38 and 45 shell plates). I would say that the Lee Progressive has been great for a new reloader.

 

I would also recommend that youtube for FortuneCookie45LC and NotAnExpert who have great tips and tricks on reloading and using the Lee Progressive 1000.



#9 packetloss

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Posted April 28 2020 - 12:32 PM

Just to add some updates to this thread.   For reloading pistol, even if you are just starting out, you should get a progressive.  With a good progressive, you can crank out 300 rounds an hour going slow and up to 800 once you get everything fully tweaked and establish your routine.  My recommendation is buy something good so you don't suffer.  I'd recommend a Dillon xl750.   If you look on ebay, the xl650s are selling for almost original cost.  I wouldn't even bother buying one of them used unless you specifically wanted the xl650 over the xl750.

 

So the question is, does it pay to reload pistol?   There are two camps of thought on this.  If you buy ammo in bulk, you could potentially get 9mm for $10 a box.  Right now, good luck finding even a single box of that $10 junk for $10.   Then there is the aspect of just what kind of quality is that stuff.  There have been reports of squib loads in Blazer, Winchester White box and many of these low priced ammos.  Likewise, folks who have tested some of these have found vastly different charge levels, leaving tons of unburnt powder etc.   Personally, I wouldn't shoot the really cheap stuff, but would probably go for the mid level like American Eagle.

 

Savings of course depends on the caliber, but compared to the really cheap crap, you would still save about 25%.  Compared to the mid level you would save about 45%.  With expensive rifle loads, you would save even more.

 

Break even point on a more expensive setup like an xl750 with casefeeder and other extras is about 12K rounds of say 9mm.  Keep in mind, Dillon equipment seems to hold its value really well, so you could probably unload it if you decide not to continue for pretty close to what you paid.

 

Other benefits with respect to quality are that you can achieve much more consistent loads (those $10-$15 factory loads will vary by way way more than .1 grain) and can fine tune them if you wish.  

I personally find it fun cranking out rounds and experimenting with loads, so it's not all about the savings.



#10 RoadRage

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Posted April 28 2020 - 10:05 PM

There's a bunch of groups on FB. 'Buy,Sell,Trade Reloading Equipment Only', 'Users of RCBS Products', 'Reloading Nation', 'Hornady Gear', Sierra Bullets', 'Dillon Precision'. You get the idea.

Type something about reloading/company name etc. in the search bar and you'll see a list of groups. Try different names to find more groups.



#11 VinnieEnz

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Posted April 30 2020 - 11:49 AM

Hi, I'n new to this site but I'm looking into getting into reloading.  My question has to do with the powder.  Is it best to buy it on-line or local?  And where are  good places to get it?

 

I'm asking because I've been told both.  That is, it's best to buy local because of hazmat shipping costs or it's best to buy on-line because of price.  I'm asking because I don't know any local Long Island places that sell reloading supplies so I have no way to compare.

 

Any insight on this would be appreciated.  Thanks.



#12 Tom Mac

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Posted April 30 2020 - 12:55 PM

Hi, I'n new to this site but I'm looking into getting into reloading.  My question has to do with the powder.  Is it best to buy it on-line or local?  And where are  good places to get it?

 

I'm asking because I've been told both.  That is, it's best to buy local because of hazmat shipping costs or it's best to buy on-line because of price.  I'm asking because I don't know any local Long Island places that sell reloading supplies so I have no way to compare.

 

Any insight on this would be appreciated.  Thanks.

First you'll have to figure out what powder you will use ( yes, it can be hard but for a starter, stick with a common powder listed in the books you'll prob need first : ABC of Reloading, Lee Loading manual ( or similar ) )

 

Then check prices at stores and online.

Usu, it pays to buy local at first since you not buying alot, later once you settle on a recipe you can buy in bulk and spread the hazmat fee over a larger shipment.

 

Suffolk Sportsman carries some powders , primers, heads... but you have to know what you want first as mentioned



#13 packetloss

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Posted April 30 2020 - 01:18 PM

Hi, I'n new to this site but I'm looking into getting into reloading.  My question has to do with the powder.  Is it best to buy it on-line or local?  And where are  good places to get it?

 

I'm asking because I've been told both.  That is, it's best to buy local because of hazmat shipping costs or it's best to buy on-line because of price.  I'm asking because I don't know any local Long Island places that sell reloading supplies so I have no way to compare.

 

Any insight on this would be appreciated.  Thanks.

 

The answer is it depends.  Hunter Sports in Massapequa sells reloading supplies and I was able to pick up primers recently that ended up being cheaper that ordering online.  I don't know how many powders they stock, but a lot of places charge $30 as the hazmat fee.   Other places only charge $15, but even so, if you are only buying a pound or 2 of powder that will increase the cost by 25%.  Even if you are buying bulk, it still might be cheaper to buy it locally, unless you can find a place that offers free shipping and no tax.  Otherwise, I was pleasantly surprised at how competitive the prices were locally.   I guess all stores have to compete with online orders so it's not really in anyone's best interest to try to rip people off.

 

So especially since you are new to reloading, you won't really know what powders and loads you like.  I would suggest buying locally, figuring out what works for you before attempting to buy bulk online.



#14 VinnieEnz

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Posted May 01 2020 - 10:41 AM

Thanks fellows now I know where to start.  It's a whole new world for me,but I'll get there, lol.



#15 Tom Mac

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Posted May 01 2020 - 05:33 PM

Think this way....

Books first and READ

Ask , read re loads for your guns that are common, search online

Now you'll have an idea of what powder you need

Buy small at first and as it works out  move up

 

 

PS: best  newb tip I have is to load with a powder that fills more than 60% of case.... so a double load will stand out very quickly as it will overflow



#16 VinnieEnz

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Posted May 03 2020 - 09:19 AM

Got it.
Btw that's a great tip
Thanks again

#17 packetloss

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Posted May 03 2020 - 10:00 AM

What caliber(s) do you plan on reloading?

 

When it comes to the books, I would start with only one.  Typically, bullet manufacturer books will only cover loads for their bullets.  The Lyman book is more universal, however, they don't have loads for CFE Pistol powder.  The Hornady book seems be pretty good overall, despite being a bullet manufacturer book.  For the most part, the first half of each reloading manual covers the basics that you need to know to reload.  I'd also recommend hitting up some relaoding forums as well to pick up some tips.   For example, in the books they tell you that you need to measure each case after doing a resize and then trim it if necessary.   This is true of rifle cartridges, but for straight wall pistol (and even .357 sig which is botteneck) you don't need to trim.



#18 VinnieEnz

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Posted May 05 2020 - 04:02 PM

What caliber(s) do you plan on reloading?

 

When it comes to the books, I would start with only one.  Typically, bullet manufacturer books will only cover loads for their bullets.  The Lyman book is more universal, however, they don't have loads for CFE Pistol powder.  The Hornady book seems be pretty good overall, despite being a bullet manufacturer book.  For the most part, the first half of each reloading manual covers the basics that you need to know to reload.  I'd also recommend hitting up some relaoding forums as well to pick up some tips.   For example, in the books they tell you that you need to measure each case after doing a resize and then trim it if necessary.   This is true of rifle cartridges, but for straight wall pistol (and even .357 sig which is botteneck) you don't need to trim.

 

I plan on reloading .270 win & .308 win.  Yes, I realize that I have a lot to learn.  Thanks for the info.  But it seems like a really interesting hobby 



#19 packetloss

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Posted May 05 2020 - 06:55 PM

I plan on reloading .270 win & .308 win.  Yes, I realize that I have a lot to learn.  Thanks for the info.  But it seems like a really interesting hobby 

 

For those 2 you can easily start with a single stage press.  For most Pistol it's just too painful to do on a single stage.   For rifle cartridges you need to lube, size/decap, trim then tumble and you probably wouldn't crank out as many as you would for pistol so a single stage isn't as bad.  You could get a turret, which would save you the time of switching dies for each stage, but for rifle, you might as well start with a single stage.



#20 packetloss

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Posted May 11 2020 - 08:08 AM

Just ran across a free very good reloading manual.  It's about as complete as the Hornady, Speer, etc manuals, with a focus on Western branded powders (Accurate, Ramshot, Blackhorn and X-treme).  If you do use any of those powders, they do have load data across many different bullet types (for example, FMJ, Berry's, etc).  Many manuals will only publish 1 or 2 types per bullet grain weight, but in this manual (at least for 9mm which I had checked out) they covered HP, FMJ, Plated RN, Lead RN, XTP, GDOT and a few more.   Looks surprisingly complete.  I wish all manuals did this.  They even seem to have a reasonably complete intro section that covers the basics of reloading.

 

 

http://www.accuratep....com/load-data/






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