Beginner Kayak - All Other - Open Discussions - Long Island Firearms

Jump to content


Welcome to Long Island Firearms, Long Island's premier source for news and education!

Welcome to Long Island Firearms, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be a part of Long Island Firearms by signing in or creating an account. You also have the ability to login with your facebook or twitter account. See the icons in the upper right hand corner.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Customize your experience here
Get the latest facts on the new NY SAFE gun laws that effect you!

Photo

Beginner Kayak

beginner kayak

  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 gravy

gravy

    Sharp Shooter!

  • Club LIF Member
  • 423 posts
  • LocationNassau

Posted November 09 2015 - 08:10 PM

Anyone have any recommendations for a good beginner kayak? This would be to primarily go around the harbors off the north shore.

Would a beginner notice the difference between a $300 and a $700 kayak?

# Advertisement

Advertisement

Posted A minute ago



#2 LiDad

LiDad

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member
  • 10011 posts
  • LocationLindenhurst

Posted November 09 2015 - 08:13 PM

Fishing or just cruising?

#3 pequa1

pequa1

    Gun Guru

  • Topic Starter
  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 4922 posts
  • Locationisn't it obvious ?

Posted November 09 2015 - 09:02 PM

More questions:

Will you be launching from the roof of a station wagon, taller SUV or off a friend or your own dock ? Do you want the convenience of hopping on and off in shallow water without a dock (go with a sit on top, which is great for clamming as well as fishing.) The sit ins might be a little warmer in cooler waters but if you roll, it won't matter whether you have a sit in or a sit on top.
My wife and I got a tandem sit on top 13.5 Perception Tribe last year and love it. While waiting for it to come in at the Dinghy Shop we were offered free use of their rentals and hated when we were stuck with the sit ins.
My own kayak is a fishing equipped Hurricane Phoenix 140 which is made of a lighter plastic, yet still tough. Had it 9 years now and catch way more fish off of it than I do off the beach or even off our bay boat. I get my Medicare card next year and am no giant so 56 lbs in a 14 footer was the way for me to go. (The longer they are, the straighter (its called tracking) they go, and somewhat faster as well.
Many on here swear by their pedal Hobies but even though I primarily fish off mine I am a bit of a traditionalist. In addition, the pedal stuff gets caught on the bottom when clamming, and makes the boat heavier as well. If you think you could get serious about kayaking, buy your second one from a kayak shop. I swear by the family runThe Dinghy Shop in Amityville, Jim and Susan Kohler are top notch. I say second one as you seem to want to save some money on your first one. Instead of getting one of the heavy ones from the appropriately named Dicks, look into used better makes on noreast.com or other websites. And no, my Phoenix is NOT for sale !

#4 gravy

gravy

    Sharp Shooter!

  • Club LIF Member
  • 423 posts
  • LocationNassau

Posted November 09 2015 - 10:22 PM

Primarily just for paddling around exploring and getting some exercise. I have access to a beach area with a rack where I can leave it so I'm not too concerned about hauling.

This one seems pretty well equipped with fishing options if I wanted to do that, and I've seen it for under $400.

http://futurebeach.c...trophy-126.html

#5 LiDad

LiDad

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member
  • 10011 posts
  • LocationLindenhurst

Posted November 09 2015 - 10:53 PM

That might be good for a pond or small lake but I wouldn't take it out in the salt.

Most saltwater kayaks - especially fishing ones - are at leas 12ft, 14-16ft is most common. The longer the easier to paddle (no jokes).

It's a bit of a trip for you but take a look at Captan Kayak in Sayville: http://www.captainka...villestore.html

#6 rubbermittens

rubbermittens

    Gun Guru

  • Donated Member
  • 3938 posts

Posted November 10 2015 - 12:20 AM

Anyone have any recommendations for a good beginner kayak? This would be to primarily go around the harbors off the north shore.

Would a beginner notice the difference between a $300 and a $700 kayak?

In Answer to your questions, yes they would, Cheap Kayaks are harder to maneuver, they are heavier and do not last as long. I Have a Ultralite, wilderness systems it is super light super stable. I am planning on upgrading to another one so you could PM me if you may be interested

#7 Parashooter

Parashooter

    Gun Guru

  • Topic Starter
  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 11553 posts

Posted November 10 2015 - 12:39 AM

ugh... I had typed up a whole bunch of food for your thought, but something happened and lost it all...

Anyway, short is get a 14-16 footer - 10 and less are for lakes & streams - you will do nothing but fight wind and current on the sound in a little boat.

Next, take a class on paddling - more to it than it seems. Long Beach does a "rescue" class which is useful, you learn how to help yourself or another kayaker if you tip, swamp, etc... NOT so easy to get back on sometimes.

#8 gravy

gravy

    Sharp Shooter!

  • Club LIF Member
  • 423 posts
  • LocationNassau

Posted November 10 2015 - 06:57 AM

Thanks for all the tips!

#9 Myrcinus

Myrcinus

    AMF YOYO

  • Established Member
  • 3602 posts
  • LocationExit 53

Posted November 10 2015 - 08:34 AM

One bit of advice:

RENT ONE!

Hell, rent 2 or 3 or as many different models as you can find. Find out what you like/dislike without buying a thing. Tell the guys you are renting from exactly what you are doing and why and they might even give you a discount. And tell you their favorite paddling spots.

If you are the social type, look into groups like Long Island Paddlers . I used to work with a couple of guys that were members and they were always willing to show a newbie the ropes.
  • anygunwilldoifuwilldo likes this

#10 fishbust

fishbust

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 2916 posts
  • LocationEastern Long Island

Posted November 10 2015 - 08:58 AM

Primarily just for paddling around exploring and getting some exercise. I have access to a beach area with a rack where I can leave it so I'm not too concerned about hauling.

This one seems pretty well equipped with fishing options if I wanted to do that, and I've seen it for under $400.

http://futurebeach.c...trophy-126.html


That one is stable for fishing but not good for going anywhere. They do not track straight and very wide for any long term paddling reaching over the sides.

If you want to cruise around and cover any kind of distance, get a touring kayak, 16 feet minimum. Adding a rudder option will help much in cross currents and wind to keep your paddling steady instead of fighting one side, unless you have a sharp keel which you won't have with a plastic kayak.
Something that looks like this will do fine!............

http://shearwaterkayak.blogspot.com/

Edited by fishbust, November 10 2015 - 08:59 AM.


#11 ProGodProGunProLife

ProGodProGunProLife

    Gun Guru

  • LIF Site Moderator
  • Others: Club LIF Member

  • 7041 posts
  • LocationSuffolk

Posted November 10 2015 - 09:25 AM

If you are only planning to paddle around the harbors and not go into the Sound a good 12 foot recreational kayak should be fine. If have a Wilderness Systems Pungo 120. You could probably get away with something smaller and cheaper in the harbors or on creeks and rivers.

If you are looking for places to paddle, I highly recommend "Paddling Long Island and New York City". It has detailed descriptions of 50 routes mostly in Suffolk.

http://www.amazon.co...y/dp/089732529X

#12 leftjammer

leftjammer

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 2643 posts
  • LocationNew Hyde Park

Posted December 15 2015 - 08:44 PM

Anyone have any recommendations for a good beginner kayak? This would be to primarily go around the harbors off the north shore.

Would a beginner notice the difference between a $300 and a $700 kayak?


The difference is quality, material, options and size

my first kayak (and Im a boat owner) is the ocean trident 11, but its really a 12' 3 if you measure it.
couldnt be happier. Used it in all over LI and a few lakes in the adirondacks. I would not go smaller than 12.
Bigger than 12 and you need more room to store it, heavier to haul it, and probably carry it a little. How you transport it should also play a part in your decision. Putting a 60# kayak on the roof of a full size SUV is gonna be tough if you're 5'6" and 144lbs for example
Im glad I didnt go 14, but I already have a boat too, so that may be why.,
If the kayak was my only boat I would probably go 14.
If you plan to keep it and its something you want to do, get something good.

Screw that $400 10 ft toy


forgot to add:
I use it for fishing, if you're not fishing disregard everything I said. LOL

#13 bberetta1

bberetta1

    Gun Guru

  • Donated Member
  • 3126 posts
  • LocationNassau

Posted December 15 2015 - 08:49 PM

Pretty sure member Destro had a thread on this a while back. I stink at using the search feature here but there was lots of good advice in that thread too.

#14 anygunwilldoifuwilldo

anygunwilldoifuwilldo

    Gun Guru

  • Donated Member
  • Others:
  • 1059 posts
  • LocationSuffolk

Posted December 15 2015 - 09:48 PM

More questions:

Will you be launching from the roof of a station wagon, taller SUV or off a friend or your own dock ? Do you want the convenience of hopping on and off in shallow water without a dock (go with a sit on top, which is great for clamming as well as fishing.) The sit ins might be a little warmer in cooler waters but if you roll, it won't matter whether you have a sit in or a sit on top.
My wife and I got a tandem sit on top 13.5 Perception Tribe last year and love it. While waiting for it to come in at the Dinghy Shop we were offered free use of their rentals and hated when we were stuck with the sit ins.
My own kayak is a fishing equipped Hurricane Phoenix 140 which is made of a lighter plastic, yet still tough. Had it 9 years now and catch way more fish off of it than I do off the beach or even off our bay boat. I get my Medicare card next year and am no giant so 56 lbs in a 14 footer was the way for me to go. (The longer they are, the straighter (its called tracking) they go, and somewhat faster as well.
Many on here swear by their pedal Hobies but even though I primarily fish off mine I am a bit of a traditionalist. In addition, the pedal stuff gets caught on the bottom when clamming, and makes the boat heavier as well. If you think you could get serious about kayaking, buy your second one from a kayak shop. I swear by the family runThe Dinghy Shop in Amityville, Jim and Susan Kohler are top notch. I say second one as you seem to want to save some money on your first one. Instead of getting one of the heavy ones from the appropriately named Dicks, look into used better makes on noreast.com or other websites. And no, my Phoenix is NOT for sale !

+1000 for the Dinghy Shop, go to explore and believe me to save money from buying the wrong one as your first!!

#15 anygunwilldoifuwilldo

anygunwilldoifuwilldo

    Gun Guru

  • Donated Member
  • Others:
  • 1059 posts
  • LocationSuffolk

Posted December 15 2015 - 09:52 PM

One bit of advice:

RENT ONE!

Hell, rent 2 or 3 or as many different models as you can find. Find out what you like/dislike without buying a thing. Tell the guys you are renting from exactly what you are doing and why and they might even give you a discount. And tell you their favorite paddling spots.

If you are the social type, look into groups like Long Island Paddlers . I used to work with a couple of guys that were members and they were always willing to show a newbie the ropes.

When you know what kind of paddling you want to do, join a club. You will paddle a lot more and learn new sites/skills and friends. Btw buying an inferior yak can potential turn you off to kayaking due to its characteristics. Get pro help at the Dinghy Shop or Peconic paddler in Riverhead!!

Edited by anygunwilldoifuwilldo, December 15 2015 - 09:55 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: beginner, kayak

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users