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Get the latest facts on the new NY SAFE gun laws that effect you!

TSA Laws


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17 replies to this topic

#1 Guest__*

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Posted December 01 2009 - 03:19 PM

So I was surfing the introweb and found this on the TSA website and figured it was time to share it...

http://www.tsa.gov/t...orial_1188.shtm

Hunting & Fishing Equipment

Traveling with outdoor gear, guns, and most camping items are permitted. Outdoor enthusiasts should carefully prepare and pack to avoid removal of prohibited items from checked baggage or surrendering prohibited items at the security checkpoint. Here is a specific list of all permitted and prohibited items. Below is information specific to traveling in pursuit of outdoor activities.

You may also want to read our information on how to travel with camping gear.

Hunting
Firearms and Ammunition
Firearms, ammunition and firearm parts may only be transported in checked baggage. Firearms, ammunition and firearm parts are prohibited from carry-on baggage.

There are certain limited exceptions for law enforcement officers (LEOs) who are authorized to fly armed by meeting the requirements of 49 CFR § 1544.219.

Following is a summary of key regulatory requirements to transport firearms, firearm parts or ammunition in checked baggage:

All firearms must be declared to the air carrier during the ticket counter check-in process.
The firearm must be unloaded.
The firearm must be carried in a hard-sided container.
The container must be locked.
The passenger must provide the key or combination to the screener if it is necessary to open the container, and then remain present during screening to take back possession of the key after the container is cleared.
Any ammunition transported must be securely packed in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition.
Firearm magazines/clips do not satisfy the packaging requirement unless they provide a complete and secure enclosure of the ammunition (e.g., by securely covering the exposed portions of the magazine or by securely placing the magazine in a pouch, holder, holster or lanyard).
The ammunition may also be located in the same hard-sided case as the firearm, as long as it is properly packed as described above.
Black powder and percussion caps used with black-powder type firearms are not permitted in carry-on or checked baggage.
The regulations are strictly enforced. Violations can result in criminal prosecution and the imposition of civil penalties of up to $10,000 per violation.

Air carriers may have their own additional requirements on the carriage of firearms and the amount of ammunition an individual may place in checked baggage. Therefore, travelers should also contact the air carrier regarding its firearm and ammunition carriage policies.

If you are traveling with a gun or ammunition, please read our information on traveling with these items for more information. Traveling with Firearms and Ammunition

Bow and Arrows
Bows and arrows are prohibited from carry-on luggage. These items should be packed in checked luggage. Any sharp objects packed in checked luggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and security screeners.

Animal Repellants
Chemical repellants can be carried in checked luggage if the volume is less than 4 ounces and has less than a 2% active ingredient. Most bear repellants exceed these limitations. We suggest buying such items at your destination and leaving them behind upon return.

Hunting Knives and Tools
Hunting knives and certain tools are prohibited from carry-on luggage. These items should be packed in checked luggage. Any sharp objects packed in checked luggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and security screeners.

Compressed Gas Cylinders
If you plan on traveling with a compressed gas cylinder such as carbon-dioxide, please read our information on traveling with these items. Transporting Compressed Gas Cylinders

Fishing
Fishing Rods / Poles
Fishing Rods are permitted as carry-on and checked baggage. However, please check with your air carrier to confirm that it fits within their size limitations for carry-on items. Ultimately, it is the carrier's decision as to whether or not it can be transported as carry-on baggage.

Spear Guns
Spear guns are prohibited from carry-on luggage. These items should be packed in checked luggage. Any sharp objects packed in checked luggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and security screeners.

Tackle Equipment
Fishing equipment should be placed in your checked baggage. Some tackle equipment can be considered sharp and dangerous. Expensive reels or fragile tackle such as fly's should be packed in your carry-on baggage

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#2 T.Webb

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    Assault is a behavior; Not a weapon.

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Posted December 01 2009 - 06:36 PM

Good to know. Thanks for posting.

This should be a sticky.

#3 glocklife

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Posted December 01 2009 - 06:40 PM

I second the sticky!!!

#4 Guest__*

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Posted December 01 2009 - 06:42 PM

"The passenger must provide the key or combination to the screener if it is necessary to open the container, and then remain present during screening to take back possession of the key after the container is cleared."

I wanna make a point of this one, DO NOT GIVE THE COMBO OUT, You use the combo to open it. Also make sure theres a tsa MGR or sargent there... My friend in 95 had a airport closed b/c a inspector was stupid enough to request it to be opened... They stated what was in it and when it was opened she YELLED GUN GUN GUN... Well she was later fired and they were unharmed... That was then this is now... I would request to have a mgr or sargent come over and go some place where its not in public so no one freaks out. Also they are not TSA locks, theses are locks that only you have the key to open...

#5 T.Webb

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    Assault is a behavior; Not a weapon.

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Posted December 01 2009 - 07:04 PM

I took a rifle and 2 shotguns along to Colorado last year. The process really isn't that bad. But expect the process to extend your check in time by at least an hour. It doesn't take that long, but you have to wait for the TSA cop to  mosey on over.

#6 vmtcmt

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    Uh-oh...

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Posted December 01 2009 - 07:25 PM

"The passenger must provide the key or combination to the screener if it is necessary to open the container, and then remain present during screening to take back possession of the key after the container is cleared."

I wanna make a point of this one, DO NOT GIVE THE COMBO OUT, You use the combo to open it. Also make sure theres a tsa MGR or sargent there... My friend in 95 had a airport closed b/c a inspector was stupid enough to request it to be opened... They stated what was in it and when it was opened she YELLED GUN GUN GUN... Well she was later fired and they were unharmed... That was then this is now... I would request to have a mgr or sargent come over and go some place where its not in public so no one freaks out. Also they are not TSA locks, theses are locks that only you have the key to open...


If you travel with non-TSA locks, they are allowed to cut them.

TSA LOCK POLICY: In some cases screeners will have to open your baggage as part of the screening process. If your bag is unlocked, then TSA will simply open and screen the baggage.

However, if you decide to lock your checked baggage and TSA cannot open your checked baggage through other means (TSA Recognized Locks ), then the locks may have to be broken.


http://www.tsa.gov/t...magedlocks.shtm

#7 hydtguy

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Posted December 01 2009 - 07:44 PM

ya, depends on where you fly from. JFK, fig. 2 hrs early, it usualy takes the PAPD anywhere from 45 min. to a full hr. and last time with an attitude. Ticket agents are not realy up to speed on what needs to be done. and yes use a TSA key lock. LEO's usualy will just open case right on the counter.....lol you should see some of the looks.
PAPD while not looking to hump you, tend to be botherd by the system and mostly its just a pain in the butt for them.
Islip was a dream, agent called, Leo was on site in 2 min., then 2 more. had a nice chat,nice bunch of guys,asked me about my xD, how i liked it, what i usualy shoot. the only thing that buged me a little was they were told they had to copy my pistol licence and drivers licence to keep a record.
coming out of Las Vages........Agent asked me to sign the FAA card, stateing that fire arm was safe and unloaded and I was on my way( 2 min. or so).She told me the FAA rules were just to keep things safe and to remove the airline from liability.


its a bit of a change out west.......

#8 T.Webb

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    Assault is a behavior; Not a weapon.

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Posted December 01 2009 - 08:14 PM


If you travel with non-TSA locks, they are allowed to cut them.

TSA LOCK POLICY:  In some cases screeners will have to open your baggage as part of the screening process.  If your bag is unlocked, then TSA will simply open and screen the baggage.

However, if you decide to lock your checked baggage and TSA cannot open your checked baggage through other means (TSA Recognized Locks ), then the locks may have to be broken.  


http://www.tsa.gov/t...magedlocks.shtm


That's true with normal luggage. However, with regards to firearms, only you can and should have the key to the lock. That's why you open the case for inspection and then re-lock it.



#9 NRATC53

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Posted March 12 2010 - 05:41 AM

Your airport experience can vary, depending on the airport and the mood of the LE personnel. I have had many trips with no problems at all, had one where the Port Authority Officer complimented my choice of rifle for a trip (JFK),and one where the words "Am I being detained? If I am not, this conversation is over" had to pass my lips. (MacArthur Airport),Most trips have fallen between those two extremes. Be courteous, but know the rules, obey them, and expect LE to do the same.

#10 vmtcmt

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    Uh-oh...

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Posted March 12 2010 - 06:40 AM

I did email the TSA requesting clarification, but that was in December, and I never heard anything back from them.

What a shock...

#11 NRATC53

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Posted March 12 2010 - 08:36 AM

No clarification needed. They explicitly state at

http://www.tsa.gov/t...orial_1666.shtm

You may only transport firearms, ammunition and firearm parts in your checked baggage. Firearms, ammunition and firearm parts are prohibited from carry-on baggage.

There are certain limited exceptions for law enforcement officers who may fly armed by meeting the requirements of Title 49 CFR § 1544.219. Law enforcement officers should read our policies on traveling with guns.

The key regulatory requirements to transporting firearms, firearm parts or ammunition in checked baggage are:

    * You must declare all firearms to the airline during the ticket counter check-in process.
    * The firearm must be unloaded.
    * The firearm must be in a hard-sided container.
    * The container must be locked. A locked container is defined as one that completely secures the firearm from access by anyone other than you. Cases that can be pulled open with little effort do not meet this criterion. The pictures provided here illustrate the difference between a properly packaged and an improperly packaged firearm.
    * We recommend that you provide the key or combination to the security officer if he or she needs to open the container. You should remain present during screening to take the key back after the container is cleared. If you are not present and the security officer must open the container, we or the airline will make a reasonable attempt to contact you. If we can't contact you, the container will not be placed on the plane. Federal regulations prohibit unlocked gun cases (or cases with broken locks) on aircraft.
    * You must securely pack any ammunition in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging that is specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition.
    * You can't use firearm magazines/clips for packing ammunition unless they completely and securely enclose the ammunition (e.g., by securely covering the exposed portions of the magazine or by securely placing the magazine in a pouch, holder, holster or lanyard).
    * You may carry the ammunition in the same hard-sided case as the firearm, as long as you pack it as described above.
    * You can't bring black powder or percussion caps used with black-powder type firearms in either your carry-on or checked baggage.



We and other authorities strictly enforce these regulations. Violations can result in criminal prosecution and civil penalties of up to $10,000 per violation.

Airlines may have their own additional requirements on the carriage of firearms and the amount of ammunition that you may have in your checked baggage. Therefore, travelers should also contact the airline regarding its firearm and ammunition carriage policies.

Also, please note that many other countries have different laws that address transportation and possession of firearms. If you are traveling internationally, please check with the authorities at your destination about their requirements.

ANyone other than you means the TSA as well. TSA locks do not fit this requirement

#12 NRATC53

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Posted March 12 2010 - 08:39 AM

A little more on the subject:

----- Original Message -----
From: TSA-ContactCenter8

Sent: Friday, August 22, 2008 1:48 PM
Subject: Re: TSA Contact Us: Passenger and Traveler Information

Thank you for your email. We apologize for the misinformation in our last response.

Passengers should not use TSA-recognized locks to secure firearm cases. Regulations state that the passenger must be the only one who retains the key or combination to open the case. TSA-recognized locks on firearm cases do not meet this requirement. If TSA needs to open the case, the passenger must open it. In addition, TSA does not recommend or endorse any specific brand or type of lock to use on firearm containers.

For more information about traveling with firearms, visit our website at www.tsa.gov.

We hope this information is helpful.

TSA Contact Center

#13 SteveG

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Posted March 12 2010 - 09:07 AM

Exactly what is a TSA recognized lock?
I can;t find the definition or meaning anywhere.

#14 NRATC53

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Posted March 12 2010 - 09:12 AM

A TSA recognized lock is one that is operable by the tsa with one of a set of special keys

#15 NRATC53

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Posted March 12 2010 - 09:13 AM

It's on their web site http://www.tsa.gov/t...tant/locks.shtm
TSA screens every passenger's baggage before it is placed on an airplane. While our technology allows us to electronically screen bags, there are times when we need to physically inspect a piece of luggage. TSA has worked with several companies to develop locks that can be opened by security officers using universal "master" keys so that the locks may not have to be cut. These locks are available at airports and travel stores nationwide. The packaging on the locks indicates whether they can be opened by TSA.

Not sure where to get a compatible lock? Try these Web sites:

#16 SteveG

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Posted March 14 2010 - 10:03 AM

Ok thanks NRATC53

#17 CHERRY911

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Posted March 14 2010 - 10:11 AM

TSA is not authorized to open any case containing firearms.  Never use a TSA lock on a firearms case, check the lock when you get the case back.  If there is any problem or missing lock contact local PD and TSA before you even open the case to check.

#18 NRATC53

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Posted March 14 2010 - 11:26 AM

I did post that, a while ago. Gave URL and text of TSA regs for firearms cases.and locks




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