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FISHING KNOT'S & MORE


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15 replies to this topic

#1 PaPaBear

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Posted October 05 2009 - 07:57 AM

http://www.animatedk...imatedknots.com

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#2 foxfire

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Posted October 05 2009 - 08:22 AM

What a great site, very cool

#3 The Architect

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Posted October 05 2009 - 08:47 AM

Thats a great find Papabear!

#4 phoenix27

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Posted February 11 2010 - 09:24 AM

Some of you anlgers out there might find this info on knots helpful. I have written a few articles about this topic in the Fisherman Mag and some other national publications. The thought is "9 for 99" or nine basic knots for 99% of your saltwater sport fishing needs. Let me know if you have any questions.

Critical Connections
by Capt. John N. Raguso

I am always amazed when conducting regional sport fishing seminars and/or teaching at the weekly Long Island Fishing School classes at the numbers of relatively experienced anglers that I meet who own the best boats and equipment that money can buy, only to fall short on the one absolutely critical connection that ties them to the catch of the day…their knot. Problem is, these folks just don’t spend enough time practicing their knots, nor do they even know which ones to use for a variety of specific purposes when attaching the reel’s running line to a shock leader, or to a snap swivel or hook. In reality, I can’t really blame them for their lack of knowledge. With dozens of knots espoused by various freshwater and saltwater “experts” trying to sell books on the subject and with new synthetic lines hitting the marketplace every season making all other lines “obsolete”, there’s a lot of confusion and disinformation out there. This article will solve at least one of those problems, so read on to learn the nine knots to know for improved sportfishing success that will be good to go in 99% of your day-to-day applications.    

Nine for 99
I could probably write an entire chapter of a very long book on each of my favorite “9 knots to know”, but space will not allow it, so I’ll have to offer some brief summaries as to why I have gravitated towards these stalwarts. Bottom line is to learn and practice these religiously and you are good-to-go for 99% of just about any of your saltwater sportfishing applications. Here’s a summary of the “fine nine” and when to use each:

1.     Improved Clinch Knot (different from a clinch or uni-knot…DO NOT tie to hooks)
     Tying line or leader to snap swivels and swivels.
     Tying direct to a lure, diamond jig or bucktail jig.

2.     Snell
     Absolutely the best knot to connect a leader to the hook.

3.     Palomar
     Easy-to-tie knot for hooks, lures, jigs and snap swivels.

4.     Dropper Loop
     Preferred for tying bottom rigs, offering stiff 90-degree standoff for add-on leaders.
     Longer dropper loop worked in conjunction with a Palomar knot for direct hook connections to that specific section of line or leader.

5.     Improved Surgeon’s Knot
     Great for connecting running line to wind-on leader with no hardware.
     Very quick & easy single overhand knot for sinker loop.
     Double overhand knot for leader loop.

6.     Spider Hitch (5 turns)
     Quick & easy knot to make double line. Works with mono up to 80-lb. Also an excellent knot (3 turns) to make an emergency end loop for braid &    Dacron when out on the water fishing in an emergency re-tie situation.

7.     Albright Special with Lock
     Great knot for tying a mono leader to braid or Dacron Line.

8.     Blood Knot (similar to dropper loop)
     Preferred for tying two lines together in an emergency when fishing.

9.     Offshore Loop (Cat’s Paw)
     Useful for tying two sections of Dacron, Spectra, Spider Line, etc. together, like when attaching a mono topshot or leader to Dacron/Spectra spooled on a reel. The one positive of this knot is that it allows the user to “undo” it to swap out mono leaders. DO NOT use this knot to attach the leader to a big game snap swivel, since it will slip if one section of the double line has been broken.

Crimps and a Haywire Twist Too
Although the aforementioned fave nine are G2G for 99% of your sportfishing applications, there are always a few exceptions to the rule, where it’s good to have a few other tricks up your sleeve. One of these scenarios comes when dealing with wire leaders. I like to make up my own and can literally make a shark rig in less than 60-seconds from scratch with the proper raw materials. I have demonstrated this fading art to many of my offshore seminar attendees and also at the Long Island Fishing School, where we spend an entire 3.5-hour session on tying these “fave 9” knots, as well as learning the art and science of producing the time-proven “Haywire Twist”, which is the ONE knot to master for ALL of your wire-tying situations. This knot is simply a half-dozen interwoven braid twists, followed by a half-dozen barrel loops. Sure, you can make this knot with your hands and a set of offshore pliers, but the rough wire with its razor sharp edges will really tear them up. I prefer to use DuBro’s “Haywire Twist Tool” to perform this work and after literally creating tens of thousands of haywire twists over 25-years with this tool, I can do it with my eyes closed, which brings up another important point…practice your knots until you can literally do them in your sleep. More fish are lost to faulty knots then they are to broken lines, so eliminate this as one source of allowing your quarry to win the battle.

Getting back to DuBro’s Haywire twisting tool, you can get this online and in your local tackle shop for $15-to-$20 and it is literally worth its weight in silver. And when you are shopping, you might as well get a few other helpful tools, like a pair of super-sharp stainless steel mono cutting pliers (made by Manley, Calcutta, and others) and/or a pair of braid cutting specialty shears like those from Ideal. All of these feature a razor-sharp edge on one blade with a serrated edge on the other and will laser-cut everything from 300-lb mono to 130-lb Diamond or Jerry Brown Spectra braid and everything in between.

Crimps are also another good tool to have in the toolbox and we could write an entire chapter on the best ways to practice this art as well. There are times, like connecting a heavy wind-on leader or top shot to a snap swivel, using a crimp is the ONLY option to make this happen due to the thickness of the mono, so be sure to have this option in your arsenal. Suffice it to say that making the proper crimp requires that you match up the diameter of the mono or wire to the inside diameter of the crimp. You must also employ the correct tool to compress or swag the softer wire around the connection, as well as bell the ends of the crimp outward so as not to cut into the mono or wire. Like I said, we could spend an entire chapter on all of the dos and don’ts. Just put this one on your radar screen to learn more.      

When attempting to make any knot remember to work it slow and steady, use some water or saliva to reduce friction, draw it up as tight as possible (use gloves to prevent nasty line cuts) and trim the ends as close as possible.

There is plenty of literature available at your local tackle shop or marine store on how to tie fishing knots. There are also freebie booklets available from Hi-Seas, Pure Fishing and other line manufacturers that are available on their websites. And if that weren’t enough, there are also some great resources on the Internet that will show you the animated step-by-step process in “slow motion” on how to construct most of the knots mentioned in this article. www.animatedknots.com and www.netknots.com are at least two great places to start. Remember, knots are one of the most important things you as fisherman can learn, whether you are a surf jockey or canyon junkie. The knot is the most critical connection in your link to your trophy catch, so read this article more than once, save it for future reference and practice, practice, practice. For more information, you can check out my website at www.marceejay.com for some photos of what these nine knots should look like in their finished form. Just click on the knots sub menu tab to view the pics that are in a slide show.


#5 PaPaBear

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Posted October 05 2009 - 07:57 AM

http://www.animatedk...imatedknots.com

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#6 foxfire

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Posted October 05 2009 - 08:22 AM

What a great site, very cool

#7 The Architect

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Posted October 05 2009 - 08:47 AM

Thats a great find Papabear!

#8 phoenix27

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Posted February 11 2010 - 09:24 AM

Some of you anlgers out there might find this info on knots helpful. I have written a few articles about this topic in the Fisherman Mag and some other national publications. The thought is "9 for 99" or nine basic knots for 99% of your saltwater sport fishing needs. Let me know if you have any questions.

Critical Connections
by Capt. John N. Raguso

I am always amazed when conducting regional sport fishing seminars and/or teaching at the weekly Long Island Fishing School classes at the numbers of relatively experienced anglers that I meet who own the best boats and equipment that money can buy, only to fall short on the one absolutely critical connection that ties them to the catch of the day…their knot. Problem is, these folks just don’t spend enough time practicing their knots, nor do they even know which ones to use for a variety of specific purposes when attaching the reel’s running line to a shock leader, or to a snap swivel or hook. In reality, I can’t really blame them for their lack of knowledge. With dozens of knots espoused by various freshwater and saltwater “experts” trying to sell books on the subject and with new synthetic lines hitting the marketplace every season making all other lines “obsolete”, there’s a lot of confusion and disinformation out there. This article will solve at least one of those problems, so read on to learn the nine knots to know for improved sportfishing success that will be good to go in 99% of your day-to-day applications.    

Nine for 99
I could probably write an entire chapter of a very long book on each of my favorite “9 knots to know”, but space will not allow it, so I’ll have to offer some brief summaries as to why I have gravitated towards these stalwarts. Bottom line is to learn and practice these religiously and you are good-to-go for 99% of just about any of your saltwater sportfishing applications. Here’s a summary of the “fine nine” and when to use each:

1.     Improved Clinch Knot (different from a clinch or uni-knot…DO NOT tie to hooks)
     Tying line or leader to snap swivels and swivels.
     Tying direct to a lure, diamond jig or bucktail jig.

2.     Snell
     Absolutely the best knot to connect a leader to the hook.

3.     Palomar
     Easy-to-tie knot for hooks, lures, jigs and snap swivels.

4.     Dropper Loop
     Preferred for tying bottom rigs, offering stiff 90-degree standoff for add-on leaders.
     Longer dropper loop worked in conjunction with a Palomar knot for direct hook connections to that specific section of line or leader.

5.     Improved Surgeon’s Knot
     Great for connecting running line to wind-on leader with no hardware.
     Very quick & easy single overhand knot for sinker loop.
     Double overhand knot for leader loop.

6.     Spider Hitch (5 turns)
     Quick & easy knot to make double line. Works with mono up to 80-lb. Also an excellent knot (3 turns) to make an emergency end loop for braid &    Dacron when out on the water fishing in an emergency re-tie situation.

7.     Albright Special with Lock
     Great knot for tying a mono leader to braid or Dacron Line.

8.     Blood Knot (similar to dropper loop)
     Preferred for tying two lines together in an emergency when fishing.

9.     Offshore Loop (Cat’s Paw)
     Useful for tying two sections of Dacron, Spectra, Spider Line, etc. together, like when attaching a mono topshot or leader to Dacron/Spectra spooled on a reel. The one positive of this knot is that it allows the user to “undo” it to swap out mono leaders. DO NOT use this knot to attach the leader to a big game snap swivel, since it will slip if one section of the double line has been broken.

Crimps and a Haywire Twist Too
Although the aforementioned fave nine are G2G for 99% of your sportfishing applications, there are always a few exceptions to the rule, where it’s good to have a few other tricks up your sleeve. One of these scenarios comes when dealing with wire leaders. I like to make up my own and can literally make a shark rig in less than 60-seconds from scratch with the proper raw materials. I have demonstrated this fading art to many of my offshore seminar attendees and also at the Long Island Fishing School, where we spend an entire 3.5-hour session on tying these “fave 9” knots, as well as learning the art and science of producing the time-proven “Haywire Twist”, which is the ONE knot to master for ALL of your wire-tying situations. This knot is simply a half-dozen interwoven braid twists, followed by a half-dozen barrel loops. Sure, you can make this knot with your hands and a set of offshore pliers, but the rough wire with its razor sharp edges will really tear them up. I prefer to use DuBro’s “Haywire Twist Tool” to perform this work and after literally creating tens of thousands of haywire twists over 25-years with this tool, I can do it with my eyes closed, which brings up another important point…practice your knots until you can literally do them in your sleep. More fish are lost to faulty knots then they are to broken lines, so eliminate this as one source of allowing your quarry to win the battle.

Getting back to DuBro’s Haywire twisting tool, you can get this online and in your local tackle shop for $15-to-$20 and it is literally worth its weight in silver. And when you are shopping, you might as well get a few other helpful tools, like a pair of super-sharp stainless steel mono cutting pliers (made by Manley, Calcutta, and others) and/or a pair of braid cutting specialty shears like those from Ideal. All of these feature a razor-sharp edge on one blade with a serrated edge on the other and will laser-cut everything from 300-lb mono to 130-lb Diamond or Jerry Brown Spectra braid and everything in between.

Crimps are also another good tool to have in the toolbox and we could write an entire chapter on the best ways to practice this art as well. There are times, like connecting a heavy wind-on leader or top shot to a snap swivel, using a crimp is the ONLY option to make this happen due to the thickness of the mono, so be sure to have this option in your arsenal. Suffice it to say that making the proper crimp requires that you match up the diameter of the mono or wire to the inside diameter of the crimp. You must also employ the correct tool to compress or swag the softer wire around the connection, as well as bell the ends of the crimp outward so as not to cut into the mono or wire. Like I said, we could spend an entire chapter on all of the dos and don’ts. Just put this one on your radar screen to learn more.      

When attempting to make any knot remember to work it slow and steady, use some water or saliva to reduce friction, draw it up as tight as possible (use gloves to prevent nasty line cuts) and trim the ends as close as possible.

There is plenty of literature available at your local tackle shop or marine store on how to tie fishing knots. There are also freebie booklets available from Hi-Seas, Pure Fishing and other line manufacturers that are available on their websites. And if that weren’t enough, there are also some great resources on the Internet that will show you the animated step-by-step process in “slow motion” on how to construct most of the knots mentioned in this article. www.animatedknots.com and www.netknots.com are at least two great places to start. Remember, knots are one of the most important things you as fisherman can learn, whether you are a surf jockey or canyon junkie. The knot is the most critical connection in your link to your trophy catch, so read this article more than once, save it for future reference and practice, practice, practice. For more information, you can check out my website at www.marceejay.com for some photos of what these nine knots should look like in their finished form. Just click on the knots sub menu tab to view the pics that are in a slide show.


#9 coyote

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Posted September 22 2012 - 10:54 PM

to reduce the amount of tackle you need, posibility of failure, and wearing your guides.

use an albright knot to join your shock leader to your braid.

#10 BillyBonds

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Posted May 29 2014 - 09:04 AM

I've always used a uni-uni knot for tying a leader to braid, and I never had a problem with this knot fluking. But as I have picked up surf casting, I have now lost 2 bucktails while casting due to the leader breaking at the knot. The knot on the leader is still there, but its snapping where the braid knot surrounds the leader. I think the braid is cutting through the leader. Am I better off switching to a Albright, or should I be using a small barrel swivel?

#11 ben5555

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Posted May 29 2014 - 09:13 AM

I've always used a uni-uni knot for tying a leader to braid, and I never had a problem with this knot fluking. But as I have picked up surf casting, I have now lost 2 bucktails while casting due to the leader breaking at the knot. The knot on the leader is still there, but its snapping where the braid knot surrounds the leader. I think the braid is cutting through the leader. Am I better off switching to a Albright, or should I be using a small barrel swivel?


I tried every knot on youtube and finally settled on using a barrel swivel, tactical anglers clip and using the palomar knot on all 3 sides. Got the idea from watching john skinners videos.Hope that helps

#12 LiDad

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Posted May 29 2014 - 10:44 AM

Improved clinch knot
Surgeons loop
Blood knot (aka barrel knot)
Uni knot (aka Trilene knot)
Palmer and "Alberto" knot

That will see you through 99.9% of your fishing needs anywhere in the world.

#13 FULL METAL JACKET

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Posted May 29 2014 - 10:46 AM

Use a better knot... The less tackle the better. Fish see everything.

Added.. There's good knot apps available for your smart phone now.

Edited by FULL METAL JACKET, May 29 2014 - 10:46 AM.


#14 pursuit22

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Posted May 29 2014 - 10:46 AM

Do not used the improved clinch on braided line. You need to use the Palmer knot.

#15 LiDad

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Posted May 29 2014 - 10:54 AM

Do not used the improved clinch on braided line. You need to use the Palmer knot.


It will work on uncoated braid. But since most people are using coated braids like Fireline and PP an 8-turn Uni works great and is easy to tie even at night.

#16 divingdon

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Posted May 29 2014 - 11:20 AM

Here's one for all you droid users from the play store search fishing knots and then down fishing knots from perished-apps free and easy to follow.
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