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Get the latest facts on the new NY SAFE gun laws that effect you!

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Newsday letter on National Concealed Carry Reciprocity


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45 replies to this topic

#41 Landlubber

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Posted May 23 2017 - 09:17 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't Columbia v. Heller hold that the Second Amendment protects a person's individual right to possess a firearm unconnected with service in a militia?

 

I think your argument that training requirements are consistent with the original intent of the Second Amendment is wrong. From my cursory reading of the Militia Act it looks like it was enacted out of necessity because we lacked a real military.

 

I'm not sure the Founding Fathers intended for us to have a military that would displace the responsibility of the people to defend themselves.I believe the function of the Army was to provide organizational and logistical support to a force of the people (militias). I think they'd be rolling in their graves to find we built a military that could wipe out the people and handed the reigns over to the Government. And it doesn't matter too much whether it's Obama, or Trump, or whoever sitting in the big chair in that regard.


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#42 slowryder

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Posted May 24 2017 - 09:36 AM

You must read the Miltia act of 1792. It clearly states that you Must "provide himself" hence the 2nd Admendment. You must provide the firearm to serve with, that is why, to have a militia, the people must have arms. Remember the United States could not afford a standing Army much less the arms and ammo. They disbanded the bulk of the revolutionary army after 1783, with the Treaty of Paris. Hence.

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Militia members, referred to as "every citizen, so enrolled and notified", "...shall within six months thereafter, provide himself..." with a musket, bayonet and belt, two spare flints, a cartridge box with 24 bullets, and a knapsack. Men owning rifles were required to provide a powder horn, ¼ pound of gunpowder, 20 rifle balls, a shooting pouch, and a knapsack.[5] Some occupations were exempt, such as congressmen, stagecoach drivers, and ferryboatmen.

If the government offers the training free of charge, after I've obtained my Arms, I'm for it.
If the government requires you to obtain it before, you obtain or as a condition to Arms, that is "infringed my right.
Hope this helps clarify why it was written the way it was.

#43 slowryder

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Posted May 26 2017 - 11:53 PM

The question arose that untrained CCW will kill more people because they lack training.
This is False.
Florida was choosen due to the most accurate and highest CCW holders, 2008-2011.

Police Officers Three Times More Likely to Murder Than Concealed Carry Permit Holders


The homicide rate nationally dropped from 5.4 to 4.7 per 100,000 during this period, and the Florida homicide rate dropped from 6.4 to 5.2 per 100,000. Since we are only looking at CCW holders in Florida, we would expect those rates to be a bit higher than the national rate for this period

When we look at the numbers for sworn officers, I found 52 domestic homicides committed by sworn police officers from 2008 – 2011. For the police, nationally from 2008 through 2011, the rate is 52/2,818,924 or 1.854/100,000 domestic homicides per 100,000 police per year.

For the data that we have, police appear to be three times as likely to commit murder as a concealed carry permit holder.

If we include all unjustified homicides (suicides were not included) found in Florida by the VPC for CCW holders for the entire four years, the rate is only 27/2,400,713 or 1.125 per 100,000 population per year. This is comparable with the homicide rates in developed western European countries. It is 61% of the rate for police officers for domestic homicides alone.

There are no complete and definitive sources of data that will give us an accurate ratio of unjustified homicides committed by police compared to CCW holders. The numbers are very small and no one keeps a national record of them.

However, the numbers found for domestic homicide cases, which are some of the easiest solved and most highly publicised cases, offer strong evidence that CCW permit holders are less likely to commit unjustified homicide than police officers, as little as one third as much.

#44 Nordon

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Posted May 27 2017 - 11:51 AM

Not realizing most of us probably go to the range more in one year than the average LEO does in a lifetime.

#45 Punisher1336

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Posted Yesterday, 11:31 AM

Not realizing most of us probably go to the range more in one year than the average LEO does in a lifetime.


Has nothing to do with ccw, which involves understanding the use of lethal force.I've seen plenty of citizens academy students role play and shoot when deadly physical force was not justified.

#46 slowryder

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Posted Yesterday, 12:01 PM

The castle doctrine is also different from state to state. What good in Fl., or Tx., etc; wouldn't fly here in NY.




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