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Interesting Way to Remove Bluing (I think) & Parkerized Sockets

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#1 JustPractical

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Posted May 11 2017 - 08:27 PM

Interesting observation (in case you ever need to remove bluing):  I was using an old joint compound blade to spread Titbond wood glue on a project.  The blade is at least 18 years old, and is blue - I assume this is blued finish to keep it from rusting.  I am also assuming it is similar to the way a gun is blued.  

 

Anyway...I got focused on the glue up, and forgot the blade with glue on it.  Went to wash it off about an hour later, and here is how it looked:

Attached File  Blueing.07.jpg   149.43KB   5 downloads

Attached File  Blueing.12.jpg   112.98KB   5 downloads

 

The bluing at the front edge is gone!  So if you are doing some kind of restoration and need to remove old bluing, it seems Titbond II wood glue will do the job.  My limited research also turned up vinegar as an option, but that will leave a light film of "rust".  

If I am completely confused about the bluing, let me know.

 

Another side "gun finish related" observation - I picked up a set of deep wall impact sockets at Harbor Freight.  Got them home and realized they were not "shiny" at all.  I noticed the black finish looked a LOT like a parkerized finish.  So, I hosed them down with balistol and then cleaned them up with a rag.  Any smart people out there to answer the questions: 1)Are the sockets parkerized? 2) Is it THAT cheap to parkerize things, and 3) is it accurate to say that the parkerizing does nothing for protection unless you oil it?      



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#2 Yaphank Kid

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Posted May 11 2017 - 08:47 PM

That looks anodized not blued. Different process. interesting though.



#3 Mad Russian

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Posted May 11 2017 - 09:03 PM

Those trowels are spring steel, they are blue. Bluing doesn't go very deep into the steel so it's not unusual for it to come off with hard use.
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#4 JustPractical

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Posted May 11 2017 - 10:30 PM

Those trowels are spring steel, they are blue. Bluing doesn't go very deep into the steel so it's not unusual for it to come off with hard use.

That's why I was so amazed that the glue took it off so thoroughly and so quickly.  I've had that blade for close to 20 years, and I'm occasionally lazy and didn't get around to cleaning till after the mud had hardened (and then I get impatient and resort to green scrubbie pads).  

Yes, they are spring steel (so I was not sure if they turned blue as part of the manufacturing process/heat).  I have some steel parts I would like to blue - so I may test drive the glue on a scrap.  Overall, not really a very useful tip for a gun owner, but still amazing at how quickly and  thoroughly it all came off.


Edited by JustPractical, May 11 2017 - 10:40 PM.


#5 Parashooter

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Posted May 12 2017 - 06:15 AM

That looks anodized not blued. Different process. interesting though.

 

you don't anodize steel though...


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#6 Sport454

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Posted May 12 2017 - 07:49 AM

Interesting observation (in case you ever need to remove bluing):  I was using an old joint compound blade to spread Titbond wood glue on a project.  The blade is at least 18 years old, and is blue - I assume this is blued finish to keep it from rusting.  I am also assuming it is similar to the way a gun is blued.  

 

Anyway...I got focused on the glue up, and forgot the blade with glue on it.  Went to wash it off about an hour later, and here is how it looked:

attachicon.gifBlueing.07.jpg

attachicon.gifBlueing.12.jpg

 

The bluing at the front edge is gone!  So if you are doing some kind of restoration and need to remove old bluing, it seems Titbond II wood glue will do the job.  My limited research also turned up vinegar as an option, but that will leave a light film of "rust".  

If I am completely confused about the bluing, let me know.

 

Another side "gun finish related" observation - I picked up a set of deep wall impact sockets at Harbor Freight.  Got them home and realized they were not "shiny" at all.  I noticed the black finish looked a LOT like a parkerized finish.  So, I hosed them down with balistol and then cleaned them up with a rag.  Any smart people out there to answer the questions: 1)Are the sockets parkerized? 2) Is it THAT cheap to parkerize things, and 3) is it accurate to say that the parkerizing does nothing for protection unless you oil it?      

AFAIK tool black & parkerizing are the same.

Cheap & easy to do with some toilet bowl cleaner [phosphoric acid] & old carbon/zinc batteries  [manganese dioxide]..... of course there are REAL parkerizing kits out there.

Either way they should offer corrosion resistance.

 

On a side note: Why are you buying HTF sockets? I know they offer a "lifetime guarantee" but I do not know anyone who has ever used it? They do not service individual sockets [as an example]. If you break one do they exchange the whole set???     Snap-On .... There IS a difference  [sorry for being a Snap-On snob]



#7 Landlubber

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Posted May 12 2017 - 06:07 PM

What I want to know is where do you get "TITbond" glue, and that what they use to keep pasties on??

 

Impact sockets like the HF ones are generally black oxide, which is real cheap and does not do much to prevent rust. Parkerizing  (manganese phosphate)is generally a little more gray in color, the difference chemically being one is an OXIDE finish (Like rust and like bluing) and one is a PHOSPHATE finish.

 

Interesting observation with the glue. Which flavor Titebond was that, original recipe, 2, or 3?  The idea of aliphatic resin taking off bluing is a new one to me, I must admit.



#8 JustPractical

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Posted May 12 2017 - 07:17 PM

What I want to know is where do you get "TITbond" glue, and that what they use to keep pasties on??

 

Impact sockets like the HF ones are generally black oxide, which is real cheap and does not do much to prevent rust. Parkerizing  (manganese phosphate)is generally a little more gray in color, the difference chemically being one is an OXIDE finish (Like rust and like bluing) and one is a PHOSPHATE finish.

 

Interesting observation with the glue. Which flavor Titebond was that, original recipe, 2, or 3?  The idea of aliphatic resin taking off bluing is a new one to me, I must admit.

"TITbond"??  Got it in Germany...working in the film industry...long story.  Those Germans can be just plain weird.

 

It was Titebond 2.  

 

Interesting info on oxide coating.  Now I need to learn how that's applied... 



#9 Landlubber

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Posted May 12 2017 - 11:34 PM

Oxide coatings are a rust process.  There are several oxides (and hydroxides) of iron, the brown stuff that grows like magic due to humidity in the air is the one everybody is familiar with, others actually prevent the brown form of rust from appearing because the available iron is already bound up with oxygen (magnetite, for example) the exact chemistry is too involved for this thread and honestly pretty confusing, I am not the guy to try to explain it. The important thing to know is black oxide is easy, phosphate is also not too hard, they are completely different processes, and if you want to do either you can look up various recipes from an assortment of texts, go ask some guys on finishing.com  (great forum of commercial metal finishers) or purchase ready-made kits for either process from Caswell.

 

For quick and dirty work, I use the Birchwood Casey instant gun blue, it's a black oxide finish and works well if the sulphury smell doesn't bother you, provides minimal rust protection but is easy to apply and leaves a gray/black finish. I buy it by the quart since I'm typically doing stuff a lot bigger than your average gun. I have another half dozen of so steel patina finishes that are all different as well and do everything from bronzing to copper plate to rust to black, and even a "green rust" finish that looks a little like cupric oxide. I got these at a sculpture supply house, sort of a mixed bag of results and not cheap either. I'd stick weith the Birchwood Casey for 95 percent of stuff, or the Bloack Oxide or Parkerize home kits from Caswell.



#10 leftjammer

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Posted May 13 2017 - 03:59 PM

good info there landlubber - sounds like you have some experience with metals







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