Jump to content


Welcome to Long Island Firearms, Long Island's premier source for news and education!

Welcome to Long Island Firearms, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be a part of Long Island Firearms by signing in or creating an account. You also have the ability to login with your facebook or twitter account. See the icons in the upper right hand corner.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Customize your experience here
Get the latest facts on the new NY SAFE gun laws that effect you!

Photo

Stolen quad


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Crazyeyes

Crazyeyes

    Respected Gunowner

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 227 posts
  • LocationNassau

Posted January 11 2017 - 09:38 PM

My buddy had his quad stolen from his trailer upstae. NYS troopers want to depose and question him. Does anybody know if this is normal operating procedure for troopers? And does he have to go through with it?

# Advertisement

Advertisement

Posted A minute ago



#2 Phoenix69

Phoenix69

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 19,723 posts
  • LocationA little place I like to call "you"ll see".

Posted January 11 2017 - 10:06 PM

I would have your friend speak with a lawyer first.

#3 leftjammer

leftjammer

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 2,391 posts
  • LocationNew Hyde Park

Posted January 11 2017 - 10:11 PM

My buddy had his quad stolen from his trailer upstae. NYS troopers want to depose and question him. Does anybody know if this is normal operating procedure for troopers? And does he have to go through with it?

 

As in the troopers want a signed statement or what??



#4 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 11 2017 - 10:29 PM

My buddy had his quad stolen from his trailer upstae. NYS troopers want to depose and question him. Does anybody know if this is normal operating procedure for troopers? And does he have to go through with it?

He needs to sign a Larceny Affidavit which is common in reporting a theft.
It's a basic form usually a brief sentence written by the officer/tpr.
Simple and Quick... The above complainant states unknown person(s) during the week of January 1-10 did steal an ATV...make, model and year.
You will sign that and a Criminal Mischief affidavit for breaking in the trailer.
You aren't being questioned as a suspect... You are the victim.
  • Crazyeyes likes this

#5 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 11 2017 - 10:30 PM

I would have your friend speak with a lawyer first.

Why suggest that?

#6 zzrguy

zzrguy

    That Guy

  • LIF Site Moderator
  • Others: Club LIF Member

  • 10,153 posts
  • LocationIn a dark corner in the center of my happy place.

Posted January 11 2017 - 10:50 PM

Some mutts broke into our hunting house and we all had to talk to the NYSP.

 

Tipical qiestion.

 

Do you know who might have done this .

 

Are you insured. 

 

What was stolen.

 

You have receipts for what was stolen.

 

Can you think of why someone would have done this. 

Blah blah blah. After twenty minutes we where done and three mouths later they caught the scumbag and a whole sh!÷ ton eveidence they got 1 to 4 years for brakening into close to a dozen home.



#7 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 11 2017 - 11:14 PM

Some mutts broke into our hunting house and we all had to talk to the NYSP.
 
Tipical qiestion.
 
Do you know who might have done this .
 
Are you insured. 
 
What was stolen.
 
You have receipts for what was stolen.
 
Can you think of why someone would have done this. 
Blah blah blah. After twenty minutes we where done and three mouths later they caught the scumbag and a whole sh!÷ ton eveidence they got 1 to 4 years for brakening into close to a dozen home.

I always recommend to anyone who owns a trailer or house upstate to remove any valuable items. The locals are not your most trustworthy neighbors. They will trespass on your property and notice any valuable items they can steal.
You should always notify the State Police if you have a problem. The local PD or Sheriff's Deputies are not trained or have the desire to enforce the laws with a local.

#8 Phoenix69

Phoenix69

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 19,723 posts
  • LocationA little place I like to call "you"ll see".

Posted January 12 2017 - 08:48 AM

Why suggest that?

Because sometimes the Police have their own agenda. You have no way of knowing what the scope of this investigation is. Maybe they are investigating people stealing quads or filing false reports about them being stolen. Sometimes what you say to the Police ends up being used against you. Better to be safe than sorry.

#9 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 12 2017 - 08:55 AM

Because sometimes the Police have their own agenda. You have no way of knowing what the scope of this investigation is. Maybe they are investigating people stealing quads or filing false reports about them being stolen. Sometimes what you say to the Police ends up being used against you. Better to be safe than sorry.

People report stolen property all the time. If it was your property, the law will clearly protect you as the victim. He may have a chance of recovering his property since his ATV was reported stolen.
People seem to be paranoid. You contact an attorney when you are arrested.
  • killian likes this

#10 ProGodProGunProLife

ProGodProGunProLife

    Gun Guru

  • LIF Site Moderator
  • Others: Club LIF Member

  • 6,149 posts
  • LocationSuffolk

Posted January 12 2017 - 09:39 AM

People report stolen property all the time. If it was your property, the law will clearly protect you as the victim. He may have a chance of recovering his property since his ATV was reported stolen.
People seem to be paranoid. You contact an attorney when you are arrested.

 

I would agree, that in a case like this ATV theft, it would be normal to report it to the police and answer routine questions about the theft.

 

On the other hand, there is a school of thought (which I do not completely agree with) that says you should never talk to the police unless it is absolutely necessary.  I think this really only applies to situations where you have even the slightest inkling that they might be treating you or begin to treat you as a suspect. 

 

The reasons given include things like 1) You might mistakenly make inconsistent statements, which make you seem guilty or suspicious. 2) The officer might remember your statements or the order of the questioning incorrectly and accuse you of lying.  (For example, the officer mentions a gun being used, but forgets this and later you say, "I don't even own a gun.".  He then says, "I never mentioned a gun, how did you know a gun was involved!")   3) You might say something that incriminates you in some other illegal activity, including things you didn't realize were illegal.  For example, an out of state resident with some standard capacity magazines might mention them in passing while being questioned on an unrelated matter, not realizing they are felony in NYS.

 

The words, "depose and question" in the original post are a bit scary to me.  If it simply said, "take his statement" or "talk about", I would have no concern.  Of course, those might not be the actual words the NYS police used.  

 

I think common sense and a bit of caution, are appropriate when speaking to the police, but not paranoia.  I also think the idea that you should NEVER talk to the police is mainly spread by criminals and defense attorneys, because for them it makes sense.



#11 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 12 2017 - 09:52 AM

I would agree, that in a case like this ATV theft, it would be normal to report it to the police and answer routine questions about the theft.
 
On the other hand, there is a school of thought (which I do not completely agree with) that says you should never talk to the police unless it is absolutely necessary.  I think this really only applies to situations where you have even the slightest inkling that they might be treating you or begin to treat you as a suspect. 
 
The reasons given include things like 1) You might mistakenly make inconsistent statements, which make you seem guilty or suspicious. 2) The officer might remember your statements or the order of the questioning incorrectly and accuse you of lying.  (For example, the officer mentions a gun being used, but forgets this and later you say, "I don't even own a gun.".  He then says, "I never mentioned a gun, how did you know a gun was involved!")   3) You might say something that incriminates you in some other illegal activity, including things you didn't realize were illegal.  For example, an out of state resident with some standard capacity magazines might mention them in passing while being questioned on an unrelated matter, not realizing they are felony in NYS.
 
The words, "depose and question" in the original post are a bit scary to me.  If it simply said, "take his statement" or "talk about", I would have no concern.  Of course, those might not be the actual words the NYS police used.  
 
I think common sense and a bit of caution, are appropriate when speaking to the police, but not paranoia.  I also think the idea that you should NEVER talk to the police is mainly spread by criminals and defense attorneys, because for them it makes sense.

When you call the police, you are the victim. You can give a statement about any knowledge you may have about the date and time you discovered the ATV stolen. The Police will ask certain questions that are necessary to help them make an arrest in the end.
The idea of being afraid to speak to the Police and calling an attorney about your property being stolen is just bizarre.
  • killian and Tom Mac like this

#12 zzrguy

zzrguy

    That Guy

  • LIF Site Moderator
  • Others: Club LIF Member

  • 10,153 posts
  • LocationIn a dark corner in the center of my happy place.

Posted January 12 2017 - 10:03 AM

If your property was stolen talk to the Police.  

 

If your a scamming POS don't talk to the Police cause they will most likely catch you being a dirt bag.

 

 

We spoke to the NYSP and they caught the dirt bags. Done end of story period the end. 

 

They don't have the time to make up crap about you with all the other crap they are dealing with. Like understaffing a response area the size of Brookhaven and 2 to 3 officer to cover it. They would sooner kick it to the insurance company Investigator let them try and build a case against you and if he finds something then they will get back involved.

 

 

BUT IF YOUR STUFF WAS STOLEN THERE IS NOTHING FOR THEM TO FIND BUT YOUR STOLEN STUFF. RIGHT


  • Crazyeyes likes this

#13 NRATC53

NRATC53

    Soon to be Ex NYer

  • Donated Member
  • 21,024 posts

Posted January 12 2017 - 10:05 AM

When you call the police, you are the victim. You can give a statement about any knowledge you may have about the date and time you discovered the ATV stolen. The Police will ask certain questions that are necessary to help them make an arrest in the end.
The idea of being afraid to speak to the Police and calling an attorney about your property being stolen is just bizarre.

Most times- absolutely. There have been times (a very few) that I have called the Law for the report of a theft or other transgression (usually trespassing) where the line of questions turned into verbal gymnastics because  either the officer(s) involved did not want to report the occurrence (In one case the Trooper told me that I would be ticketed instead of the unlicensed driver who drove into me, he then gave her a ride to work. Their whole conversation was in spanish and I only picked up the dirty words so I know his penis and her mouth were mentioned and in another case I was told by members of a local Sheriff's Dept that I would face charges if I pressed the issue. I pressed charges, and they pounded sand when my attorney got them fired


  • ProGodProGunProLife likes this

#14 ProGodProGunProLife

ProGodProGunProLife

    Gun Guru

  • LIF Site Moderator
  • Others: Club LIF Member

  • 6,149 posts
  • LocationSuffolk

Posted January 12 2017 - 10:06 AM

When you call the police, you are the victim. You can give a statement about any knowledge you may have about the date and time you discovered the ATV stolen. The Police will ask certain questions that are necessary to help them make an arrest in the end.
The idea of being afraid to speak to the Police and calling an attorney about your property being stolen is just bizarre.

I mostly agree.  But, as I said, the words "depose and question" sound a little bit intimidating, as if they might suspect some wrongdoing on the part of the victim (e.g., insurance fraud).  Again, those might not have been the actual words that the NYS Police used, as we are getting their words 3rd hand here.  



#15 finfeathr

finfeathr

    Respected Gunowner

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 173 posts

Posted January 12 2017 - 10:07 AM

Unreal...someone gets property stolen, informs the police to get help, then doesn't know if they should cooperate with the police?

I think some of you guys are completely paranoid...in which case, why call the police in the first place?



#16 ProGodProGunProLife

ProGodProGunProLife

    Gun Guru

  • LIF Site Moderator
  • Others: Club LIF Member

  • 6,149 posts
  • LocationSuffolk

Posted January 12 2017 - 10:19 AM

Unreal...someone gets property stolen, informs the police to get help, then doesn't know if they should cooperate with the police?

I think some of you guys are completely paranoid...in which case, why call the police in the first place?

IMO, there are not enough details in the original post to determine if this is routine or something more.  For example, did he already file a police report and answer basic questions about it and now they are calling him to be "deposed and questioned"?  If so, I would be at least a bit concerned.  A deposition is a questioning under oath.  I would at least ask why they want this.  Have they caught a suspect and want the deposition to support the case against him?  Maybe they caught the thief, but he is claiming the owner sold it to him.  Who knows.

 

On the other hand, if he just called in to report the theft and they asked him to come in to file a report and answer some questions, I would not be concerned.  


  • NRATC53 likes this

#17 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 12 2017 - 10:26 AM

Most times- absolutely. There have been times (a very few) that I have called the Law for the report of a theft or other transgression (usually trespassing) where the line of questions turned into verbal gymnastics because  either the officer(s) involved did not want to report the occurrence (In one case the Trooper told me that I would be ticketed instead of the unlicensed driver who drove into me, he then gave her a ride to work. Their whole conversation was in spanish and I only picked up the dirty words so I know his penis and her mouth were mentioned and in another case I was told by members of a local Sheriff's Dept that I would face charges if I pressed the issue. I pressed charges, and they pounded sand when my attorney got them fired

On the MV104A her information would require a Drivers License and other information. That trooper would have to indicate a 509.1 VTL for Unlicensed Operation. I don't know why he would risk getting a command discipline for ignoring that. At least you had to local deputies terminated for their lack of training.

#18 NRATC53

NRATC53

    Soon to be Ex NYer

  • Donated Member
  • 21,024 posts

Posted January 12 2017 - 01:52 PM

On the MV104A her information would require a Drivers License and other information. That trooper would have to indicate a 509.1 VTL for Unlicensed Operation. I don't know why he would risk getting a command discipline for ignoring that. At least you had to local deputies terminated for their lack of training.

He did not fill one out, the other driver was driving on a permit with no licensed driver. He told me if he filled it out he would have to ticket me. I was on my way to meet my 8 year old son's school bus so I couldn't wait around and get a Sup.He was willing to risk it, no doubt. You sure do have a good set of ethics from what I've seen but believe me, not all on the job share that.



#19 angelonm

angelonm

    Gun Guru

  • Club LIF Member
  • 1,785 posts

Posted January 12 2017 - 02:06 PM

If a crime was committed report it to the police. Answer their questions. They have no vested interest in you other than you were the victim of a crime. Now if you committed the crime don't report it to the police. This is not personnel it is business. And that's how they treat it........

#20 boosti

boosti

    Gun Guru

  • Established Member + Classifieds
  • 7,477 posts
  • LocationStrong Island

Posted January 12 2017 - 03:19 PM

He did not fill one out, the other driver was driving on a permit with no licensed driver. He told me if he filled it out he would have to ticket me. I was on my way to meet my 8 year old son's school bus so I couldn't wait around and get a Sup.He was willing to risk it, no doubt. You sure do have a good set of ethics from what I've seen but believe me, not all on the job share that.

I thought the NYSP would be thorough in investigating an accident. I know cops will and can sh*t can a call to avoid the paperwork. Every department has them.
I've seen it here upstate with the local Police and Sheriff's department.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users