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Get the latest facts on the new NY SAFE gun laws that effect you!

What kind of gun control do they have in Chile


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7 replies to this topic

#1 foxfire

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Posted March 01 2010 - 09:56 AM

The people are going nuts in the wake of this disaster. Looting is rampant.
http://www.aolnews.c...ps-700/19376836

It begs the question" what kind of gun control do they have in Chile"?
No good deed goes unpunished.

#2 PeepSight

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Posted March 01 2010 - 10:32 AM

Bring Your Gun to Chile?
Now that interesting question is another item I am often asked.

Gun Ownership Allowed  Although gun legislation is more restrictive in Chile than in the USA, for the most part, it is possible to own a gun and use it for self-defense. Concealed carry is also possible but very unlikely for most people. Fewer than 200 people have a concealed carry permit in all of Chile. The same is true with regard to getting a permit to own a silencer or a machine gun: possible but difficult. Home gun permits are relatively "easy" to get however. You can register two handguns per person in your household. After that, you have to get a sportsman's license and you can register up to six more guns: rifles, shotguns or pistols. To go through the entire process from importing the gun, to registering the gun, to buying ammunition for the gun you will have to deal with the local police, the army, and customs.

Guns cost double or even triple the relative price in the USA when purchased in Chile. So it might make some sense to import your own gun. Expensive or high-end makes can cost five times as much as they do in the USA, making them attractive to import. Accordingly, I would recommend bringing down an expensive gun (or two) to justify the taxes and other import costs. For instance, you might bring an H&K pistol. Or go really big and bring a Desert Eagle. Be sure to bring several filled clips (with your favorite rounds, e.g., nylon tipped hollow points) and accessories too. You will need to know the exact number of rounds, clips and other accessories you have in the case when you fill out the forms. Standard pistol calibers in Chile are .38, .45, .357, 9mm, and I think they also have .40 and .44. If you try to bring in a non-standard caliber, you might have a problem and the bureaucrats might even reject your application. All might be fine too, just be aware of the potential risk if you try to bring in, for example, a Desert Eagle .50 cal. revolver.


Basic Import Procedure  To bring your gun, just put it in a lockable case and pack it in your suitcase. However, you must first have a residency visa and a carnét (national ID card), a.k.a. Cédula de Identidad Extranjero.  You are only allowed to have two handguns in Chile for home defense. If you are a hunter or a collector you can get special permission to have more guns. Here is the rest of the procedure:

1. Upon arrival, declare to aduana (customs) that you have a pistol, shotgun, or rifle packed in your suitcase. Use a low value since you will have to pay a tax on what you declare (note: $300 and under is generally duty free from the USA so long as you have or can make up a receipt with an American address on it, and the receipt says that the gun was "made in the United States of America"—otherwise the tax will be 25% of the receipt’s value or the value you declare). They will take it and give you a receipt with the serial number on it. Be sure to lock the case. Keep the receipt. Be sure to complete the importation process in a timely manner since your gun is subject to being destroyed by aduana officials after 90 days. Note: If you are bringing the gun down for a friend (yes, you can do that), you will be required to fill out the form with the customs agent (which becomes your receipt) with your information on the front side. Just be sure to include your friend's name and national ID (RUT) number on the backside. That way your friend will be able to get it from customs himself and deal with the tramite.

2. Make a copy of both the receipt and your carnet (both sides).

3. Go to the registro civil (sort of like a city hall) for any comuna (city area) and get them to print for you what is called a "Certificado de Antecedents para Fines Especiales" (cost under $2) which basically shows that you have no criminal record or record of domestic violence.

4. Complete (in your word processor) TWO copies of the document called "Solicitud para Importar y Internar" una Arma. Click here to get a copy of the form online. It has to be filled out perfectly and printed. If you make an error, white out o crossing out words will not be accepted. You will have to go back another day to get it submitted.

5. Take the above documents to the police station (Comisaria de Carabineros) nearest to your home that handles gun imports. For most ex-pats (who choose to live on the east side of town), that would be the comisaria near Plaza Egaña or the one near La Granja (if you live in Peñalolen). They will collect around 35,350 pesos ($53), or a little more if you are bringing in extra clips and rounds, and give you a copy of their stamped receipt along with a copy of the form you filled out above. They then send the package to be processed and you should get it back in 10-15 days. They will not call you when it is ready so be sure to get the local carabinero's phone number (i.e., the guy who helps you) and call to see when you can pick it up. Make sure you make this carabinero your friend! Be patient and jolly. The person that the carabineros deal with is a (nice) woman named Veronica (02) 4413899 who will get your properly completed form processed. You can also call her regarding status.

6. When the document is finally ready, take the stamped form back to aduana (probably at the airport in Santiago) and pay them whatever tax they require (perhaps $90 on a $400 to $800 gun). Almost certainly, you will be required to go there accompanied by the carabinero. NOTE: due to a free trade agreement, if you declare your gun is used and bought by a private party for $300 or less, there is ZERO tax (tariff). So you might want to remember that when you bring your gun into the country. Make sure it costs less than $301 on your declaration. However, also note that the charging of the tariff is arbitrary. If you do not have a receipt showing USA origin then they might charge you based on whatever they think the gun is worth. So it is best to fabricate (private party) a receipt or have a receipt from the gun dealer.  They then will give you (actually the cop) your gun and accessories and you are on your way. By now you will have paid close to $70 to $160 in fees and transportation costs too, along with about 7-12 hours of your time.


7. You will have head back accompanied by the carabinero (police officer) who will then get the gun and take it to a testing (shooting) range run by the ejercito (army). The head of operations is named Luis, and you will want to make sure that Luis knows that you are giving authorization to the carabinero to pick up your gun for you. You leave it with them for about a week and they test it for a cost of about $9 plus time and transportation of another $25. Unless the gun is new, the authorities will want to ensure that the gun works property. Basically, you leave the receipt that the testing center guy gives you with the cop and give the cop 30,000 pesos in advance to pay for all the tramites and fees, including his ride back to pick up your gun for you. He will give you your change later.

8. After the police officer gets your gun for you, he will keep it in his office until you:
(a) pass a psychiatric test (cost around $130) and the psychiatrist fills out the form that the carabineros give you for this examination (don't forget to ask for it from the carabinero! And make sure the shrink also fills out the section pertaining to your vision!),
(b) bring a photocopy of your carnet,
© pass a legal and technical knowledge test at the police station (see note below),
(d) pay a $20 fee, less than 13,000 pesos,
(e) get another "Certificado de Antecedents para Fines Especiales" (cost under $2) from the registro civil near you,
(f) and get your local carabinero's office to give you a "Certificado de Residencia" verifying your address. To get the latter item, you have to bring a utility bill (e.g., gas, electricity) or your rental contract with your name and address on it, or possibly your employment contract. This caribinero station will almost certainly be different than the one you have been dealing with to get your gun. It has to be one within the comuna where you live.


Note on the test at the police station: be careful, it is not easy. You will need to pass with 75% minimum and know the basic features of Chilean gun legislation and parts of the gun in Spanish, but if you fail you can take it again. Ask the carabinero for the little book Boletín de Instrucciones de los Carabineros de Chile to help you study the "law" in Chile. If you strike up a friendly relationship with the carabineros that attend to you, it is likely that they will help you when you take the test--at least to understand some vocabulary. Take a look at the friendly carabineros who were helping us with our inscripción.
There are no illegal guns - just undocumented guns.
It's not about gun control .......it's about total control. We are not subjects - we are citizens!  >:(
Calling Illegal Immigrants "Undocumented Aliens" is like calling Drug Dealers "Unlicensed Pharmacists"

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John Galt was right!

#3 LIRES1987

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Posted March 01 2010 - 11:09 AM

Quote

Carabineros
These guys are apparently very highly regarded in Chile. They have a long history of being very aggressive against criminals and unlike most Latin American police forces they are very professional. They don't play around like our cops.

http://cenlat.org/im...carabineros.jpg
http://www.pamba.ca/...iago Police.jpg
http://newsimg.bbc.c...fp_guard416.jpg
http://deptocom.cara.../1024x768-1.jpg
http://bligoo.com/me...arabineros4.jpg
^ I love their uniforms, very snazzy. Very Germanic looking.
Chris

#4 SteveG

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Posted March 01 2010 - 12:05 PM

PeepSight said:

Bring Your Gun to Chile?
Now that interesting question is another item I am often asked.

Gun Ownership Allowed  Although gun legislation is more restrictive in Chile than in the USA, for the most part, it is possible to own a gun and use it for self-defense. Concealed carry is also possible but very unlikely for most people. Fewer than 200 people have a concealed carry permit in all of Chile. The same is true with regard to getting a permit to own a silencer or a machine gun: possible but difficult. Home gun permits are relatively "easy" to get however. You can register two handguns per person in your household. After that, you have to get a sportsman's license and you can register up to six more guns: rifles, shotguns or pistols. To go through the entire process from importing the gun, to registering the gun, to buying ammunition for the gun you will have to deal with the local police, the army, and customs.

Guns cost double or even triple the relative price in the USA when purchased in Chile. So it might make some sense to import your own gun. Expensive or high-end makes can cost five times as much as they do in the USA, making them attractive to import. Accordingly, I would recommend bringing down an expensive gun (or two) to justify the taxes and other import costs. For instance, you might bring an H&K pistol. Or go really big and bring a Desert Eagle. Be sure to bring several filled clips (with your favorite rounds, e.g., nylon tipped hollow points) and accessories too. You will need to know the exact number of rounds, clips and other accessories you have in the case when you fill out the forms. Standard pistol calibers in Chile are .38, .45, .357, 9mm, and I think they also have .40 and .44. If you try to bring in a non-standard caliber, you might have a problem and the bureaucrats might even reject your application. All might be fine too, just be aware of the potential risk if you try to bring in, for example, a Desert Eagle .50 cal. revolver.


Basic Import Procedure  To bring your gun, just put it in a lockable case and pack it in your suitcase. However, you must first have a residency visa and a carnét (national ID card), a.k.a. Cédula de Identidad Extranjero.  You are only allowed to have two handguns in Chile for home defense. If you are a hunter or a collector you can get special permission to have more guns. Here is the rest of the procedure:

1. Upon arrival, declare to aduana (customs) that you have a pistol, shotgun, or rifle packed in your suitcase. Use a low value since you will have to pay a tax on what you declare (note: $300 and under is generally duty free from the USA so long as you have or can make up a receipt with an American address on it, and the receipt says that the gun was "made in the United States of America"—otherwise the tax will be 25% of the receipt’s value or the value you declare). They will take it and give you a receipt with the serial number on it. Be sure to lock the case. Keep the receipt. Be sure to complete the importation process in a timely manner since your gun is subject to being destroyed by aduana officials after 90 days. Note: If you are bringing the gun down for a friend (yes, you can do that), you will be required to fill out the form with the customs agent (which becomes your receipt) with your information on the front side. Just be sure to include your friend's name and national ID (RUT) number on the backside. That way your friend will be able to get it from customs himself and deal with the tramite.

2. Make a copy of both the receipt and your carnet (both sides).

3. Go to the registro civil (sort of like a city hall) for any comuna (city area) and get them to print for you what is called a "Certificado de Antecedents para Fines Especiales" (cost under $2) which basically shows that you have no criminal record or record of domestic violence.

4. Complete (in your word processor) TWO copies of the document called "Solicitud para Importar y Internar" una Arma. Click here to get a copy of the form online. It has to be filled out perfectly and printed. If you make an error, white out o crossing out words will not be accepted. You will have to go back another day to get it submitted.

5. Take the above documents to the police station (Comisaria de Carabineros) nearest to your home that handles gun imports. For most ex-pats (who choose to live on the east side of town), that would be the comisaria near Plaza Egaña or the one near La Granja (if you live in Peñalolen). They will collect around 35,350 pesos ($53), or a little more if you are bringing in extra clips and rounds, and give you a copy of their stamped receipt along with a copy of the form you filled out above. They then send the package to be processed and you should get it back in 10-15 days. They will not call you when it is ready so be sure to get the local carabinero's phone number (i.e., the guy who helps you) and call to see when you can pick it up. Make sure you make this carabinero your friend! Be patient and jolly. The person that the carabineros deal with is a (nice) woman named Veronica (02) 4413899 who will get your properly completed form processed. You can also call her regarding status.

6. When the document is finally ready, take the stamped form back to aduana (probably at the airport in Santiago) and pay them whatever tax they require (perhaps $90 on a $400 to $800 gun). Almost certainly, you will be required to go there accompanied by the carabinero. NOTE: due to a free trade agreement, if you declare your gun is used and bought by a private party for $300 or less, there is ZERO tax (tariff). So you might want to remember that when you bring your gun into the country. Make sure it costs less than $301 on your declaration. However, also note that the charging of the tariff is arbitrary. If you do not have a receipt showing USA origin then they might charge you based on whatever they think the gun is worth. So it is best to fabricate (private party) a receipt or have a receipt from the gun dealer.  They then will give you (actually the cop) your gun and accessories and you are on your way. By now you will have paid close to $70 to $160 in fees and transportation costs too, along with about 7-12 hours of your time.


7. You will have head back accompanied by the carabinero (police officer) who will then get the gun and take it to a testing (shooting) range run by the ejercito (army). The head of operations is named Luis, and you will want to make sure that Luis knows that you are giving authorization to the carabinero to pick up your gun for you. You leave it with them for about a week and they test it for a cost of about $9 plus time and transportation of another $25. Unless the gun is new, the authorities will want to ensure that the gun works property. Basically, you leave the receipt that the testing center guy gives you with the cop and give the cop 30,000 pesos in advance to pay for all the tramites and fees, including his ride back to pick up your gun for you. He will give you your change later.

8. After the police officer gets your gun for you, he will keep it in his office until you:
(a) pass a psychiatric test (cost around $130) and the psychiatrist fills out the form that the carabineros give you for this examination (don't forget to ask for it from the carabinero! And make sure the shrink also fills out the section pertaining to your vision!),
(b) bring a photocopy of your carnet,
© pass a legal and technical knowledge test at the police station (see note below),
(d) pay a $20 fee, less than 13,000 pesos,
(e) get another "Certificado de Antecedents para Fines Especiales" (cost under $2) from the registro civil near you,
(f) and get your local carabinero's office to give you a "Certificado de Residencia" verifying your address. To get the latter item, you have to bring a utility bill (e.g., gas, electricity) or your rental contract with your name and address on it, or possibly your employment contract. This caribinero station will almost certainly be different than the one you have been dealing with to get your gun. It has to be one within the comuna where you live.


Note on the test at the police station: be careful, it is not easy. You will need to pass with 75% minimum and know the basic features of Chilean gun legislation and parts of the gun in Spanish, but if you fail you can take it again. Ask the carabinero for the little book Boletín de Instrucciones de los Carabineros de Chile to help you study the "law" in Chile. If you strike up a friendly relationship with the carabineros that attend to you, it is likely that they will help you when you take the test--at least to understand some vocabulary. Take a look at the friendly carabineros who were helping us with our inscripción.

And you guys complain with a round trip to the PLB in Suffolk!

Steve

#5 emsjeep

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Posted March 01 2010 - 01:46 PM

The short answer, was, don't bother... ;)
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#6 Colt 700

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Posted March 01 2010 - 01:53 PM

The events of the last 6 weeks in Haiti, Hawaii and now Chile, show the importance of having a properly stocked Go Bag, ready to go. Some skills go go with it are a good idea as wel.
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#7 Hernan

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Posted August 18 2011 - 12:26 AM

LIRES1987 said:

These guys are apparently very highly regarded in Chile. They have a long history of being very aggressive against criminals and unlike most Latin American police forces they are very professional. They don't play around like our cops.


This is my first post here because (1) I stumbled upon this thread and (2) I live in Chile.   Although I do agree that the Carabineros are rather professional and respected by the law-abiding folks here, there is unsurprisingly a good deal of resentment on the part of the leftists here, partly left over from the days of the military regime that effectively ended in 1990.   As a result there is considerable violence directed toward the Carabineros by protesting students, drunken sports followers from the lower classes, and the rather large anarchist population we have in Chile, as well as some of the trade unionists.   In the early 1990s it was not unusual to see the Carabineros with Uzis on the streets but that is very rare now.  In fact, any Carabinero who draws his service .38 revolver is likely to be in a good deal of trouble, unless he was obviously fired upon first -- such is the sensitive issue of political correctness, national image,   and cries of "police brutality" which are very much a part of the left around here.  We actually have a double weakness in dealing with violent crime here.  In the recent attacks upon the carabineros with fire-bombs, the judges almost invariably allow the criminals back onto the streets with incredibly weak and meaningless probation restrictions.  Twenty years ago, if a protest group had barricaded the national highways and airports to prevent travelers from reaching shelter, food, and hospitals, they would not have lasted long at the hands of the Carabineros.  Now, their national command, under the executive branch,  has been weakened to the extent that we have seen barricades and burning tires for a week or more, without authorization to clean up the riffraff.   So I wanted to add this comment to the observation by the other poster that the carabineros "don't mess around" -- unfortunately they are now required to treat the growing hordes of criminals with kid gloves.  One outcome of this could be seen at a recent illegal demonstration in Santiago, where there were only two civilians reported injured, and 95 carabineros hurt.  This suggests remarkable restraint.    

#8 Mad Russian

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Posted August 18 2011 - 01:14 AM

As a favor to all: WHY DO YOU HAVE TO QUOTE A HUGE POST? Can't you just copy the relevant parts? Especially if your reply is TWO lines!




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